Prior to work activities commencing on any project regardless of scope, the presence of asbestos containing materials must be established and risk managed – refer Asbestos Management Procedure and Policy. At SHAPE asbestos is assumed to be present in all materials until proven otherwise.


1

At the project pre-construction phase the building asbestos register (Division 5 VIC Ops) is requested from the building manager for review as part of the development of the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Buildings constructed prior to 31 December 2003 are always assumed to contain asbestos until proven otherwise. Unless there is absolute certainty the building and or work areas do not contain asbestos a hygienist must be engaged to conduct invasive inspections and sampling prior to work commencing- (Division 6 VIC Ops).

NB existing building hazardous materials registers and clearance certificates should not be relied upon as a sole source of information to determine absolute certainty asbestos is not present.

3

Buildings constructed after 31 December 2003 are assumed to contain asbestos unless the building owner or manager can provide one of the following:

  • Asbestos register confirming no Asbestos is present in the entire scope of works
  • A hygienist certificate confirming no asbestos is present
  • A written statement confirming no asbestos is present

Where asbestos is present or assumed to be present:
4

The project Project Delivery Plan and project Risk Register detail the project specific asbestos hazards and controls, including controls for asbestos removal works if part of the project scope.

5

The project manager has provided a copy of the building asbestos register to all trade contractors as part of the subcontract documentation.

6

The Site Specific Induction details all known locations of asbestos containing materials and other site specific controls for treating all materials as suspect until proven otherwise.

7

The building asbestos register is posted at the site noticeboard so that all workers have access to it.

8

All known and or assumed asbestos containing material is labelled or signposted where reasonably practical to do so.

9

All closed ceilings, voids, bulkheads, service risers and building materials are presumed to contain asbestos until a hygienist has confirmed otherwise.

10

All sites that contain or are suspected to contain asbestos will complete and display SHAPE’s Unexpected ACM Discovery or Exposure Flowchart. This flowchart serves as the project’s asbestos exposure emergency response plan on the site notice board. Note: The flowchart must be filled in to identify a worker decontamination area in consultation with building management, such as an existing shower or change facility. This response plan is also reflected in the Project Project Delivery Plan and project Risk Register.

11

Contractor SWMS detail asbestos related hazards and controls where there is a risk of asbestos disturbance through work activities.

12

Removal work is to be engaged only by an appropriately licenced contractor.

13

Removal work will require an asbestos removal plan and formal notification to the regulator.

14

Air monitoring kept on file for all asbestos removal activities regardless of the type of material, i.e. bonded or friable.

15

Hazardous waste is tracked through the Waste Management Register or through the site diary – waste transport and receipt dockets are filed.

16

ACM transport vehicles have the appropriate licenses or authorities – copies of records are maintained on site.

17

Workers are regularly consulted regarding any changed circumstances in relation to asbestos containing materials, i.e. removal works, unexpected discoveries, air monitoring outcomes, sampling outcomes, suspected exposure incidents.

Communication should be delivered through Pre Start Meetings, Toolbox Talks and the Site Specific Induction.

18

Building management consulted regarding asbestos related matters such as removal works, unexpected discoveries, air monitoring outcomes, sampling outcomes, suspected exposure incidents.

19

All unexpected discoveries are to be reported as High Risk Near Miss incidents regardless of the outcome – i.e. a suspected discovery that is later proven not to be asbestos through testing is still to be reported.



Concrete pumping is defined by legislation as a high risk activity and requires detailed planning and coordination prior to commencing. Where boom pumps are to be used, review of the Lifting Operations SHAPE Minimum Standard and the Plant and Equipment SHAPE Minimum Standard will provide additional guidance.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to concrete pumping activities for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Contractor Safe Work Method Statements (SWMS) are prepared by subcontractors for construction work associated with concrete pumping, and reviewed using the SWMS Review.

3

Relevant information, training, and instructions have been provided to workers who are involved in the activity. For example: Site Specific Induction, Toolbox Talks, training in SWMS, Pre-Start Meetings, etc.

4

A Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment been completed, and the concrete pump has been entered into the site Plant and Equipment Register.

5

The concrete pump company has provided records of pump registration, pipe x-ray results, completion of daily logs, maintenance and service prior to arriving to site.

6

Worker competencies have been verified and copies taken as evidence.

Note: a boom pump requires the operator to have a high risk licence.

7

Risk Assessments consider and include:

  • Weather conditions
  • Site accessibility
  • Site limitations
  • Back up equipment
  • Volume of concrete, i.e. number of trucks, timing between loads, etc.
  • The designated pump washout area complies with environmental and local authority requirements
  • A safe place has been identified where to clean the line
  • Restricted work times (local council rules)
  • Equipment capacity
  • Concrete pump capacity
  • Concrete supplier’s requirements
  • Overhead power or other services
  • Underground services, pits, etc.

8

The suitability of the pump location has been assessed with respect to access, other work activities, the public, and the shortest run of pump line.

9

Access routes for the pump and agitators have sufficient bearing capacity.

10

Access is provided for the general public, to public areas in the vicinity of the pumping unit and the delivery trucks, if the pump unit is set up in the street.

Note: Permits and the traffic management plan, including signage and exclusion zones, are reviewed and kept on site.

11

Scheduling of the pumping activities considers the full scope of the concrete works, to ensure adequate daylight hours to complete the task. Where operation of the plant is required at night, or in low light conditions, artificial lighting should be provided.

12

Clear access to the pump unit has been provided for concrete trucks.

13

Delivery pipes are positioned away from access ways, or exclusion zones have been implemented.

14

Steel pipes are secured to prevent movement and blow outs.

15

Pipe joining clamps have safety pins to ensure the clamp does not inadvertently open.

16

All lines, pipes, couplings and fittings must be capable of withstanding the maximum pump pressure (including blockages) or the pump pressure must be adjusted so that it does not exceed the pipeline rating.

17

A safe location has been identified and implemented for the concrete tester vehicle.

18

Concrete trucks have been suitably spaced between loads to prevent truck banking, traffic congestion and concrete perish.

19

Task Inspections are completed during pumping activities to ensure compliance to the approved work methods.

20

The agreed method of communication is in use and effective, e.g. two way radio, hand signals, whistle tones.

For Boom Pumps:
21

Factors have been considered that could affect the ability of the ground to provide adequate support (e.g. underground services, trenches, excavations, pits, tanks).

Where hazards have been identified, certification has been provided by a competent person that the surface has adequate bearing capacity to support the concrete pump (e.g. structural engineer, geotech engineer, scanning techniques).

22

When a pump is positioned near a trench, the nearest outrigger to the trench must be at least as far away from the trench, as the trench is deep. This rule assumes a zone of influence working at a 45° angle.

23

The timbers, pads or bog mats used under the outriggers or stabilisers are appropriate for the type of pump and ground conditions.

24

Outriggers are extended in accordance with the manufacturer’s load charts.

NOTE: partially extended outriggers may or may not be permitted according to the manufacturer’s load charts. This must be verified on each occasion.

25

The presence of overhead power lines has been assessed and equipment is positioned outside of the designated no go zone.



Confined Space risk management requirements can vary between jurisdictions and is a specialist area. Refer to SHAPE’s Confined Space Procedure and contact a member of the EHSQ Team if you believe a confined space entry is required as part of your scope of works.


1

During Pre-Construction, the Confined Space has been identified by the building owner or building management.

2

The areas identified as confined spaces have been verified by a competent person.

A competent person is someone that holds a certificate/licence or documented evidence of competency.

3

The project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan identify the confined space hazard and controls and references the SHAPE Confined Space Work Permit.

4

Subcontractor SWMS address hazards and controls specific to the location and activity. The SWMS have also been reviewed using the SWMS Review.

5

The Site Specific Induction identifies confined space locations and site specific requirements.

6

Subcontractors have been consulted and trained in the SWMS and all documentation required.

7

All workers have been trained in emergency / rescue procedures and a trial rescue has been enacted and documented using the Record of Toolbox Talk – High Risk Activity Emergency Response. Emergency equipment is in place as per the confined space emergency rescue plan.

8

All workers hold confined space entry competencies – records have been copied and filed.

9

Prior to the commencement of works, confined spaces are clearly signposted with confined space warning signage.

10

Pre-Start Meetings are held prior to every confined space entry.

11

The Confined Space Work Permit (including the and confined space entry log) are in place at the point of entry.

12

Equipment has been tested for calibration by a competent person prior to use and records are on file.

13

Air samples have been taken and recorded prior to entry to the confined space.

14

Air sampling is taken and recorded at regular intervals whilst workers are in the confined space.

15

Adequate lighting has been installed or provided for the task.

16

Adequate ventilation is available via natural or mechanical means.

17

Non-hazardous, non-flammable products are used in place of solvents, adhesives, paint, etc.

OR a risk assessment has been completed when hazardous or flammable products must be used.

18

Alternative methods of construction have been considered to reduce the need for welding, brazing, painting, cutting, drilling, etc. within the confined space.

19

If asbestos containing materials have been identified, workers are instructed on asbestos awareness and control measures prior to entry.

20

Electrical services have been isolated / controlled in the vicinity of the works.

21

The risk of biological hazards (e.g. mould spores, contaminated water, sewerage) has been considered and managed.

22

A competent Standby Person is allocated for and identified in the Confined Space Work Permit & SWMS.

23

Implementation of the work method is reviewed via a Task Inspection during each entry, and controls are amended and communicated as required.



Fire Sprinklers are great for putting out fires and 100% effective at causing thousands of dollars in water damage in a short space of time if activated unintentionally.


1

During pre-construction, the Project Team has undertaken an inspection of the sprinkler system and other services using the Other Services Survey (“Part C”) to determine and document:

  • The location of sprinkler valve sets
  • The method of isolation of the valve set
  • Administration requirements to isolate valve sets
  • Emergency contact numbers if emergency isolation of the valve set is required

2

The information gathered during the Other Services Survey inspection and the building management tenant/building rules are used to:

  • Determine the risk level of damaging sprinklers from works being completed in the area
  • Controls to be used to control the risk of damage
  • The risk assessment and controls are documented in the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

3

Wherever possible, the risk of damage to sprinkler heads must be eliminated. Where the risk cannot be eliminated due to constraints such as Building Owner rules, or the risk of fire outweighs the risk of sprinkler damage, the project team will implement controls based on the hierarchy of control.

4

Once the controls are determined, the Project Team will then review the controls with the building owner/manager to obtain approval to implement. Should a change be required, the Project Team will assess the changes and determine the best control method and update the project Risk Register.

5

When controls are agreed to by all parties the project Risk Register is distributed to all project participants (subcontractors, client, building owner) for their records and action where required such as the creation of Safe Work Method Statements, Risk Assessments or other safe systems of work. Distribution of the documentation will take place through the Procore Submittal process.

6

Project specific controls to mitigate the risk of damage to sprinkler heads are included in the Site Specific Induction and all workers are inducted into these requirements.

7

Monitoring and inspection of the controls where sprinkler pipes or heads have been removed will be completed on a daily basis, before and at the end of each shift. These inspections are to be documented in the site diary (notes) or raised as an observation through Procore.

8

Other controls where the wet fire system is maintained will be completed weekly as a minimum and documented within the Procore Observations tool.

9

Task Inspections will be undertaken where work is being completed on or around the fire sprinkler system such as:

  • Demolition
  • Hot works
  • Installation of duct or pipe work in ceiling spaces
  • Full height or elevated joinery units
  • Full height doors and glazing

10

When works are substantially complete and the risk of damaging the sprinkler system has been reduced, i.e. the installation of ceiling tiles are completed, the use of scaffolds or EWPs have ceased and full height joinery is installed, the controls used to mitigate damage to sprinklers may be removed and standard base building controls may be implemented, i.e. impairment notices and drain downs.

The project team must assess the risk prior to removing the agreed controls and the project Risk Register will be updated. This assessment must include the building owner/manager.



SHAPE has supported our construction site-based team members with industry leading Coronavirus guidance material, which has undergone numerous revisions since February 2020


1

During preconstruction, the project team reviews the current status of Coronavirus (COVID-19) in their state or territory, current government restrictions and the potential impacts on the scope of works for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan

2

SHAPE’s Coronavirus Action Plan and Coronavirus Action Plan – Site Implementation Guide are made available to stakeholders upon request and kept in hard copy in the site office or on the site noticeboard

3

Coronavirus Site Entry Signage and the Site Specific Induction include Coronavirus control measures which are communicated to all workers and visitors

4

All workers are expected to stay away from site if they feel unwell in any way

5

All workers are expected to self-isolate with their household if any member of their household undertakes a COVID-19 test (even if it is a precautionary test), as a minimum until the household member’s test results are received. Even if the household member returns a negative test result, consultation with SHAPE on each situation’s unique circumstances must take place prior to returning to site

6

Workers who become unwell are expected to notify SHAPE Site Management of any projects they attended within the 14 days before feeling unwell

7

The daily Pre-Start Meeting includes COVID-19 health-related declarations

8

Coronavirus information resources are posted on site noticeboards and signage is displayed around site

9

Lifts may have a defined maximum capacity, determined by the building management or in consultation with the building management

10

SHAPE’s suite of Coronavirus informative Toolbox Talks are delivered as and when appropriate

11

SHAPE people work on site only when it is essential and appropriate to do so (with consideration of the particular state and territory recommendations at the time) – otherwise we work from home

12

Meetings are conducted virtually when possible

13

Non-essential visitors to site are encouraged to consider alternatives

14

Handwashing and sanitising stations are located in convenient and accessible locations

15

Hygiene, cleaning and sanitising regimes of an increased frequency are aligned to the SHAPE Coronavirus Action Plan – Site Implementation Guide

16

SHAPE Project Team members continually monitor the effectiveness of control measures – controls are updated as required or as new information is received

 

17

Paperless sign in / out systems (e.g. SignOnSite) are implemented when practicable

18

Meal breaks are staggered and lunch rooms are reorganised to ensure both density and social distancing requirements

19

Person limits may be set for meeting rooms and other closed spaces. Excess tables and chairs are removed

20

Floor decals may be seen in various locations throughout site

21

Toolbox Talks are held outdoors when practicable, or otherwise in the largest open space available on site. Toolbox Talks may be conducted in reduced sized groups to limit the number of people in one area

22

Communications may be delivered electronically (e.g. SignOnSite briefings), during trade-specific Pre-Start Meetings, on whiteboards or on SHAPE TVs to reduce paper use

23

Temperature Screening may be implemented when a SHAPE Risk Assessment identifies this as appropriate, with consideration to:

  • The recommendations of Australian Government agencies and authorities at the time
  • The recommendations of state and territory government agencies and authorities at the time
  • The recommendations of relevant industry associations at the time
  • The number of workers on site
  • The floor size available
  • The ability to schedule works and break times to maximise physical distancing
  • The effectiveness of the body of control measures as outlined within the Coronavirus Action Plan – Site Implementation Guide
  • Any other matters that SHAPE considers relevant to the risk assessment of this activity

24

When SHAPE workers conduct Temperature Screening, they will be trained in the appropriate process via the SHAPE Temperature Screening Training

When planning for tasks that require two or more workers to be less than 1.5m apart:
25

  • Consider as the preferred option if the task can be completed in another way to minimise close contact, i.e. differently to how you would normally do it that reduces the need to work in close proximity of each other
  • Can you put the task off until a later date? This may support planning for alternative methods of work
  • Can you use mechanical aids rather than people to support, hold or move objects? Sheet lifters, duct lifters, trolleys, proprietary propping systems, load rated straps and tiedowns, etc.

What if you can’t avoid work in close proximity of others?
26

It’s all about limiting your frequency of exposure, i.e. the duration of the task and number of times you need to work closely with others.

  • Try and reduce the duration of the task by breaking it down into short steps
  • Wear long sleeve / leg clothing to avoid skin contact and contain perspiration
  • Wear a face mask, shield or covering as an added precaution
  • Ensure workers are trained in how to appropriately use, wear and store face masks using SHAPE’s Record of Toolbox Talk – Face Masks and Coverings
  • If you’re sweating – take a break – cool down and change to fresh clothes if you can
  • Use disinfectant spray or wipe down shared equipment and tools
  • Wash your hands before and after the activity
  • Consider wearing a P2 mask depending on how close you are going to be to others, particularly if the closeness will be for longer than 10 minutes
  • Consider other PPE that may support the process
  • If you don’t feel comfortable completing the task – talk about it with your team members – you don’t have to proceed if you have concerns!

27

The Record of Toolbox Talk – Face Masks and Coverings is delivered when a task requires two or more workers to be less than 1.5m apart, or to all workers in states or territories where the government has mandated the wearing of face coverings outside the home

Persons Displaying Cold or Flu-like Symptoms:
28

  • The Site or Project Manager will respectfully and privately request the project participant to discuss concerns
  • The Site or Project Manager have complete discretion with regard to requesting a project participant to leave the site
  • The Site or Project Manager should also engage with the project participant’s employer to explain the situation if the person involved is a worker
  • Any person with cold or flu like symptoms will be requested to seek medical advice and provide confirmation of said advice. Where states have declared additional waves of COVID-19 outbreak, less common symptoms such as headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, muscle aches will also prompt a request to leave site and seek medical advice
  • In some instances, the site may temporarily close and additional precautionary cleaning may take place in consideration of the circumstances. Support will be provided by the SHAPE EHSQ Team
  • All SHAPE employees and subcontractors will be referred to the SHAPE Employee Assistance Program

29

Confirmed or Suspected Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases are treated with the affected party’s privacy, confidentiality and dignity in consideration at all times. Impacted stakeholders will be communicated with and consulted in a prompt, honest and transparent manner. The SHAPE Emergency Response Team (ERT) provides support and direction to all SHAPE Project Teams

30

SHAPE’s Business Continuity Plan may be activated in the event of a significant business disruption. In planning for potential significant business disruptions, SHAPE has considered a number of outcomes from varying scenarios, including, as examples only, persons displaying cold or flu like symptoms and site-based employees, workers or visitors being diagnosed with COVID-19 or requiring to be self-isolated



Cutting and Coring activities are all activities that include the use of concrete/masonry cutting saws, core drilling (including hand held and self-propelled or remote controlled equipment), and may also include the use of rotary hammer drills in certain circumstances.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to cutting and coring activities for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan. This includes consultation with the building manager regarding building requirements for cutting and coring.

2

All relevant information in relation to cutting and coring is detailed within the project Site Specific Induction and communicated to workers through the site induction process.

3

Subcontractor SWMS are reviewed via the SWMS Review, for inclusion of site specific cutting and coring controls.

4

Building management are consulted regarding the possibility of in situ services – e.g. power, water, gas, other.

5

Scanning has been completed and a written report has been provided.

6

A structural engineer has provided a written approval for the proposed works.

7

The Site electrician has completed inspections and isolations in accordance with the Permit to Cut or Core, the Cutting and Coring Concrete and Masonry Elements Procedure, and the Electrical Safety Procedure. The site electrician has signed off on the Permit to Cut or Core.

8

A Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment has been completed for all cutting and coring equipment that is self-propelled, powered by a combustible engine or via hydraulic system. All such items have been included in the Plant and Equipment Register.

9

The Permit to Cut or Core is issued for each cutting and coring activity, and all workers involved have signed onto the permit.

10

If any changes to the scope of cutting or coring activities are required – the work ceases, the work is reassessed and a new Permit to Cut or Core is issued.

11

The Permit to Cut or Core is valid for 24 hours only, and the handback section is filled in at the completion of each shift.

12

RCD protection devices are in place for all power, including 3 Phase power outlets.

13

Core plugs or sectioned building elements are not be permitted to free fall, i.e. containment measures are defined in the contractor’s site specific SWMS.

14

A works methodology is submitted with all cutting and coring involving the sectioning and removal of concrete and masonry elements (e.g. stair penetrations, demolition of precast concrete walls).

15

Exclusion zones / barriers are established below all cut and core locations.

16

Warning signage is posted around exclusion zones prior to the commencement of works.

17

Waste water from the cutting process is captured and disposed of properly, i.e. not in toilet pans, urinals, bathroom sinks, storm water drains, etc.

18

A trained and competent spotter is positioned below the cut and core locations, outside of the exclusion zone.

19

Fixed covers or certified barriers are in place around all penetrations and openings.

20

A Task Inspection is completed for high risk cutting and coring activities, to monitor compliance with the SWMS and work methodology.



Working near live electrical services is one of the key hazards on commercial fitout and refurbishment projects, and requires detailed planning and risk assessment prior to the commencement of work.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to electrical hazards and controls, for inclusion to the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

The electrical contractor undertaking the Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”) has provided a task-specific SWMS prior to undertaking the survey. The SWMS are reviewed and approved using the SWMS Review.

3

Prior to conducting the Electrical Protection Plan survey, electrical workers receive the Site Specific Induction and the Record of Toolbox Talk – Electrical Contractors. These requirements apply to all cabling contractors, i.e. fire services, security, mechanical controls, BMS, etc. as the project progresses. A copy of the Electrical Safety Procedure is appended to the Record of Toolbox Talk – Electrical Contractors.

4

A separate Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”) is completed for each project stage, level and work area.

5

Electrical Protection Plan(s) (“Part A”) are reviewed, make safe actions are verified as being completed and signed off by all parties prior to proceeding with other trade activities.

6

Mechanical electrical services are surveyed and controlled for each project stage, level and work area within the Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”).

7

After the initial Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”) has been completed, where there has been increased or new electrical risks identified the project Risk Register and Site Specific Induction are updated.

8

Prior to proceeding with electrical strip out or demolition activities, the electrical contractor has provided task-specific electrical SWMS based on the scope of works identified in the Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”).

9

Switchboard work is performed with full isolation of power from the downstream supply source. An Electrical Deviation Risk Assessment is completed and approved by the SHAPE General Manager or delegate, in the unlikely event that work needs to be performed on a partially live switchboard (i.e. where a live feed to the switchboard is present).

10

Where fuses are to be removed from T-OFF boxes as a method of isolation, the SWMS details specific hazards and controls to be implemented – i.e. use of insulted tools and equipment, trained electrical rescue personnel, electrical rescue kit, etc.

11

Existing cabling is removed from all partitions, ceilings, bulkheads and voids prior to other trades accessing these areas. This may require the electrician to break open these restricted spaces for a visual inspection and to remove and strip cables.

12

Temporary Switchboards – refer to the Temporary Switchboards SHAPE Minimum Standard.

13

Construction Lighting – refer to the Construction Lighting SHAPE Minimum Standard.

14

Construction Wiring and Extension Cord Sets – refer to the Construction Wiring and Cord Extension Sets SHAPE Minimum Standard.

15

Extra Low Voltage (< 50V AC or < 100V DC) cable ends are terminated by use of terminal connectors – this includes fire, security, mechanical controls, nurse call systems and similar.

16

All existing Low Voltage (50 to 1000V AC, or 100 to 1500V DC) cable ends that are not being removed or stripped out are junction boxed.

17

Circuit breaker isolations are locked with a propriety locking device including a padlock or cable lock and electrical tag.

18

SHAPE switchboard signage is posted on the switchboard door or escutcheon panel when isolations or other work activities are taking place on the switchboard.

19

When circuit “tails” are removed from the switchboard, an electrical tag or label is assigned to each breaker identifying that tails have been removed. This may also be achieved where the majority of tails are removed via an updated circuit legend or other method of labelling.

20

Where live cables or other electrical hazards are present, Restricted Space signage is posted at regular intervals at the location of the hazard to ensure high visibility. These locations are marked up on a drawing, and form part of the Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”), and the Site Specific Induction.

NB Restricted Access signage placed on a partition wall to reflect a ceiling hazard is not appropriate.

21

SHAPE Red warning tape – “DANGER – Live Electrical Cables – Do Not Cut” is placed at 2m intervals to all existing cables that are remaining LIVE.

Always consider locations outside of the site envelope such as building core areas, lobbies, toilet facilities, that may need to be accessed for service runs to risers and plant rooms, etc.

 

22

External work areas are assessed for overhead and underground services hazards. Hazards and controls are detailed within the
Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”) and associated contractor SWMS.

23

Use of Plant and Equipment in proximity of overhead or underground power has been risk assessed and controls implemented (e.g. exclusion zones, spotters, supply authority permits).

24

Ongoing review of electrical hazards and controls takes place via site walks, Procore Hazard Observations, Procore Site Inspections and Task Inspections.

25

New or increased electrical hazards are risk assessed and any changed conditions communicated via Toolbox Talk. Changes to electrical safety controls are reflected in an updated Site Specific Induction.

26

Prior to energising new circuits the electrician must perform testing in accordance with the Testing, Energising and Commissioning Plan (“Part B”). Test results are provided by the electrician prior to and after energising. Each electrical services trade completes a separate Testing, Energising and Commissioning Plan (“Part B”) prior to energising their installation, e.g. fire services, mechanical, security electricians, etc.

27

Prior to energising, Energising in Progress warning signage is installed at regular intervals throughout the site and at the site entry point.

28

Prior to energising, all workers have participated in the Record of Toolbox Talk – Electrical Energising to communicate electrical hazards and changed site conditions in relation to energising activities. This may include changes to temporary power and lighting.

29

Once energising has commenced, no trades other than electricians are allowed in the energised ceiling space without a documented risk assessment completed for the area that needs to be accessed, and the controls identified in the risk assessment have been put in place.



Construction lighting supplied via temporary construction switchboards is the preferred method of site lighting for SHAPE projects – refer to the SHAPE Electrical Safety Procedure. This SMS is to be reviewed in conjunction with the Temporary Switchboards SMS and Construction Wiring and Cord Extension Sets SMS.


1

Prior to commencing the installation of construction lighting, the project team reviews the project documentation and plans for the location of construction light fittings to ensure adequate lighting levels will be maintained as the project progresses.

NB – the reliance on task lighting for later stages of the project as partitions close up is not preferred.

2

Construction lighting is fitted below ceiling levels, allowing lighting to be maintained throughout the life of the project without impacting lighting levels when the ceiling is closed.

3

Construction lighting to areas with finishes such as wall and floor tiles is extremely important to ensure a high quality finish and will usually require a lux level that replicates the final lighting levels.

4

Lamps / globes in light fittings are protected against mechanical damage, i.e. wire cages or anti vandal style diffusers.

5

All light fittings are suspended from jack chains or fixed to stable building elements.

6

Office light fittings are not used as temporary construction lighting as they do not comply with the Australian Standard for construction lighting.

7

Where more than one lighting circuit is installed, the lighting circuits are distributed between RCDs.

8

Adequate lighting is provided to all work areas and other locations including stairways, fire exits, passageways and adjacent to switchboards to allow safe access and egress.

9

Exit lighting with battery back-up (or self-illuminating exit signage) is posted so that it is visible from all locations on site.

NB the project floor plan / partition layout must be considered when planning the position of emergency exit lighting and signage to ensure adequate lighting is available as the project progresses.

10

Emergency lighting with battery back-up is installed at least every fourth light, above temporary switchboards and within 2 metres of exit signs.

Other types of lighting:
11

Portable luminaries / task lights (e.g. flood light tripods) have protection / mechanical guard to the lamp and adequate stability, or are secured to a suitable structural element.

12

Task lighting is the least preferred option for site lighting.

13

Existing light fittings may be used for lighting in certain circumstances such as minor works activities if supplied via an RCD protected circuit. Refer to the Electrical Safety Procedure for the definition of minor works where this may be permitted.

14

Existing light fittings may not be used if they have been removed from the ceiling grid.


This SMS is to be reviewed in conjunction with the Temporary Switchboards SHAPE Minimum Standard, Construction Lighting SHAPE Minimum Standard and Electrical Safety Procedure.


1

Construction wiring is segregated from permanent / existing wiring.

2

Construction wiring is not fixed to free standing fences that have no fixed posts (or equivalent means of support).

NB this may include certain types of hoarding and other temporary structures.

3

Construction wiring is supported by dedicated catenary wires, cable clips or cable tray – the use of existing metal services, hangers, ceiling framing, etc. is not permitted.

4

Construction wiring is physically protected where there is a risk of mechanical damage – using medium duty, heavy duty or corrugated conduit, armoured cable, or flexible electrical hose – unless the risk assessment shows such protection is not necessary to maintain electrical safety.

5

Construction wiring is marked with iridescent yellow tape with the words ‘construction wiring’ spaced at intervals not exceeding 4 metres.

NB – the use of SHAPE Red warning tape is not permitted on construction wiring.

6

Construction wiring is positioned to avoid crossing roadways or access ways where cranes, high loads or heavy machinery may travel. If this is not possible, an effective means to minimise the risk of vehicular contact with the overhead wiring system is provided and detailed within the Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”).

7

Leads are only used when supplied by a temporary construction switchboard on the same level. If this is not achievable, a documented risk assessment must be undertaken.

8

Switchboards are supplied by a new run of cable which has a minimum cross sectional area of 4mm2.

Flexible cords, cord extension sets, flexible cables and accessories:
9

Flexible extension cords have heavy duty sheathing.

10

Domestic type flexible cord extensions are not used.

11

As a general rule, 10A cord extension sets with a cross-sectional area of 1.5mm2 should not be longer than 20m. If the supply cord of the tool is greater than 2m, then this must be included when calculating the maximum length of 20m.

12

Extension leads are supported on insulated hooks or lead stands.

13

Cord extension sets emanating from the temporary construction switchboard are wrapped around the insulated tie bar, and then supported on an insulated support directly above the switchboard at a minimum of 2.2m above the floor level.

14

Cord extension sets are not in contact with any conductive building materials or heat generating equipment (e.g. ceiling grid, temporary construction lighting, scaffolding, sprinklers, etc).

15

Portable RCD boxes (Portable Socket Outlet Assemblies or PSOAs) are RCD protected and meet the requirements of AS 3012.

16

Portable Socket Outlet Assemblies (PSOAs) and cord extension sets display a current test tag. New in-service tools and equipment are also tagged.

17

Existing power supplies should only be used for minor or short duration works (e.g. 2-3 days and do not have any demolition or building works).

This can be achieved via:

  1. RCD located at the existing switchboard supplying the final subcircuit, OR
  2. A Portable Socket Outlet Assembly (PSOA) plugged directly into the socket outlet.


The use of Temporary Switchboards is the preferred method of power supply for SHAPE projects – refer to the SHAPE Electrical Safety Procedure. This SMS is to be reviewed in conjunction with the Construction Lighting SMS, and the Construction Wiring and Cord Extension Sets SMS.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to power and lighting supply requirements, for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

As part of the site-specific Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”), the required number and locations of temporary switchboards for the project is determined.

Switchboards are located / positioned to suit the maximum flexible cord lengths – generally no more than 20 metres.

3

Power supply for trade requirements has been considered including mixing areas, battery stations and 3 phase power for equipment such as floor grinders.

4

Domestic switchboards are not used. All switchboards fully comply with AS/NZ 3012 Electrical installations – Construction and demolition sites, and are installed in accordance with AS/NZS 3000 Wiring Rules.

5

After their initial installation, all switchboards are verified (inspected and tested) in accordance with AS/NZS 3000 and AS/NZS 3017. The testing equipment used, serial number and calibration date/certificate are documented with the test records, which have been provided to SHAPE prior to use. Re-testing is completed every three months.

6

The SHAPE Site Manager uses the Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”) or this Temporary Switchboards SHAPE Minimum Standard to check all switchboards prior to their use on site, and regularly thereafter.

7

Final sub-circuits are protected against overload and short circuit by a circuit breaker RCD protection with a maximum rated residual current of 30 mA, which operates in both the active and neutral conductors. Lighting circuits are distributed between RCDs to minimise the impact of the operation of a single RCD.

8

Switchboard RCDs undergo calibration testing every 3 months (every 1 month in Victoria). Test results are provided to the SHAPE Site Manager.

9

Push-button RCD tests (by users) are performed at least once per day prior the use of portable RCD equipment.

10

Switchboards are readily accessible and clear from obstructions. A minimum clearance of 600mm is maintained to allow unimpeded opening of the switchboard door.

11

Switchboards are of robust construction and materials, to withstand mechanical damage from the environment or other external influences that may be expected at the location. In order of preference, this may include:

• Attachment to a wall, pole, post, floor or other stable structure

• Attachment to a freestanding or temporary structure, in an elevated position suitably designed for the purpose. It must be stable and the design must take into account any external forces that may be exerted on the board (e.g. bolted to the slab, fixed securely to the ground, or secured to a wide base of support)

12

The SHAPE temporary switchboard signage is posted on the front door of all switchboards. This is to ensure that each switchboard identifies the source of supply from which it originates, and that each switchboard is marked by way of numbers, letters, or both to distinguish one switchboard from another.

13

In multi-level buildings, switchboards are positioned in a manner that eliminates the need for flexible cords or cables to be run between levels (exceptions for work in lift shafts, stairwells, service shafts, formwork, external staging or sub-mains of construction wiring).

14

For outdoor locations and areas susceptible to moisture, switchboard enclosures have a minimum degree of protection of International Protection (IP) rating 23.

15

Live parts are effectively protected at all times against contact by people operating equipment on the switchboard, including the connection or disconnection of plugs to socket outlets (i.e. escutcheon panels are secured and all pole fillers are in place).

16

An insulated tie-bar or similar arrangement is in place on each switchboard for the anchorage of cables or flexible cords, in order to prevent strain and mechanical damage at their connections or terminations.

17

An insulated lead support is situated at least 2.2m above the switchboard.

18

Each switchboard has a door or lid to maintain a degree of protection. The door or lid:
• Requires the use of a tool for removal
• Is fitted with a facility for locking
• Is fitted with a means of retaining the door in the open position, when the board is in use
• Is kept closed except when access is required
• Allows the safe entry of leads away from pinching points in the door, to prevent damage to the leads
• Has words to the effect of “Keep Doors Closed. Run all leads through bottom of board.”

19

The “live parts” or “electric shock” symbol is displayed in locations where additional attention is required to be given to the removal of covers and the like (i.e. as a minimum on the escutcheon panel).

20

All switchboards are provided with a clearly labelled main isolating switch, which interrupts supply to all final subcircuits, submains and socket outlets originating from the board.

21

When the isolating switch has been activated, provision must be made to prevent electrical equipment from being inadvertently energised, i.e. deliberate action in addition to the normal method of operation is required to energise the circuit. This provision may be via the locking of the switchboard door, or another lockable space or enclosure. Warning tags or notices alone are not acceptable. Short-circuiting and earthing may only be used in addition to locking.

22

Lockable covers are fitted over RCDs associated with outgoing circuits. These covers must not prevent access to the isolating switches. This is not a mandatory legal requirement in all states however SHAPE adopts this well known practice as a national minimum standard.

23

All cable entry ports are insulated to protect cables from damage.

24

A person has been nominated to ensure that all power circuits are isolated or made inaccessible so as to eliminate the risk of fire, electric shock or other injury to persons after completion of the daily work.

25

All temporary supply mains are protected by a circuit breaker or high rupturing capacity (HRC) fuses.

26

Switchboards display only current testing information, i.e. all out of date test labels have been removed.

27

Switchboards are supplied via new cable runs.

Note: this means that existing cables may not be used to supply temporary switchboards or lighting.

28

Submains cables supplying temporary switchboards are physically protected in conduit from the board and into the ceiling space or beyond if the works activities in the location present a risk of damaging the cable.

29

Battery charging tables have been provided to the side of, or behind switchboards.

30

Auxillary socket-outlet panels meet the requirements of AS/NZS 3012 Section 2.6.11. Of note, they must be:
• Located at a height of between 1.2 and 2m above the floor
• Securely mounted to a permanent structure or a temporary structure that has been specifically designed for the purpose
• Must be individually controlled by a double pole switch

31

Portable RCD boxes (Portable Socket-Outlet Assemblies or PSOAs) must meet the requirements of AS/NZS 3012 Section 2.6.10. Of note, they must:
• incorporate over-current and RCD protection
• be of robust construction
• have extended sides or covers over the outlets
• have a degree of protection appropriate for the environment (IP33 as a minimum)
• incorporate a heavy duty flexible cord no more than two metres long

32

Domestic type powerboards, double adaptors, three pin plug (piggy back) adaptors and homemade powerboards must not be used on construction or demolition sites.


Emergency Preparedness and Incident Response planning is essential to ensure that all SHAPE projects and offices are adequately prepared and resourced in case of an emergency or in case any workers require rescue.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews emergency planning and incident response requirements for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

NB: this will include the Building Management Emergency Response protocols.

2

The nearest available health or medical services have been identified,and they have been contacted to establish their ability to assess or treat work-related injuries.

NB:

  • Isolated sites (more than 20 minutes from appropriate medical services) may require further due diligence and planning to respond to medical emergencies
  • For shift work, consideration must be given to the medical facility’s opening hours

3

Emergency Evacuation Diagrams have been created using the Evacuation Diagram Tool.

4

Emergency Evacuation Diagrams are displayed on site, in accordance with the Guide to the Evacuation Diagram Tool.

5

Emergency response procedures are documented within the Site Specific Induction Handout.

6

Emergency Evacuation training is completed within the first 2 weeks of commencing the project, and then every 3 months thereafter.

7

Task-specific Emergency Response Plans are prepared and implemented for all high risk activities or activities requiring potential rescue resources
and equipment.

8

The nominated warden has completed a relevant training course through a Registered Training Organisation (RTO).

9

Where hot works activities are undertaken, nominated personnel are competent in the use of fire fighting equipment. The nominated person has demonstrated that they understand how to select and use the designated fire fighting equipment.

10

Nominated first aid officers have current qualifications. Refer to the First Aid Requirements Guide.

11

  • A First Aid Room is provided for sites that will reach a peak of 100 workers or more. The following items are provided inside the First Aid Room:
  • A sink and wash basin with hot and cold water (unless this can be provided within easy access from the First Aid room)
  • A work bench or dressing trolley
  • Cupboards for storing medicaments, dressings and linen
  • A hazardous waste container or bio-hazard bags for soiled dressing
  • A sharps disposal system
  • Electric power points
  • Hygienic hand cleanser and disposable paper towels
  • An examination couch with waterproof surface, pillow, blanket and disposable sheets
  • An upright chair
  • An examination lamp with magnifier
  • A bowl or bucket (minimum 2 Litres capacity)
  • A chair and a table or desk
  • Names and contact details of first aiders and emergency organisations on the SHAPE First Aid contacts poster
  • A first aid kit appropriate for the workplace, including a resuscitation mask and face googles
  • A stretcher
  • An Automated External Defibrillator (also known as an AED or simply a “defibrillator”)

A first aid room should:

  • Be located within easy access to toilet facilities and a sink with hot and cold water (where this is not provided in the room itself)
  • Offer privacy via screening or a door be easily accessible to emergency services, with a minimum door width of 1 metre for stretcher or wheelchair access
  • Be well lit and ventilated
  • Be large enough for its purpose (e.g. 14 square metres as a guide)
  • Have an entrance that is clearly marked with the SHAPE First Aid contacts poster

12

The number of first aid kits required has been assessed based on site-specific risks, including the scope of works. Where the use of hazardous chemicals is required, additional first aid supplies may need to be provided by SHAPE or the subcontractor.

13

Arrangements have been made to ensure first aid kits are regularly re-stocked.

14

Emergency Exits are clearly signposted and operational.

15

Where there are any changes to emergency exit requirements, these are communicated through Toolbox Talk and Site Specific Induction.

Emergency Evacuation Diagrams are updated to reflect these changes.

16

Any action to the smoke detection, sprinkler, hydrant or fire hose reel systems that will be affected throughout the project have been communicated to all parties on the project via Toolbox Talk and Site Specific Induction Handout.

17

Sprinkler heads remaining active have been highlighted to improve visibility. Sprinkler heads at risk of damage have been capped or caged.

18

Control measures to manage damage to sprinkler heads have been risk assessed, with the controls implemented and communicated via Toolbox Talk and the Site Specific Induction Handout.

19

The building emergency warning system is operational throughout the project, OR

An alternative warning system has been implemented (e.g. horn system, nurse call, etc.)

20

Fire extinguishers and their signs must be mounted in accordance with AS2444. This includes, but is not limited to:

EXTINGUISHER MOUNTING WALL BRACKET HEIGHTS

  • A minimum of 100mm from the floor to the bottom of the extinguisher (fire extinguishers must not be situated on the ground)
  • A maximum of 1200mm from the floor to the top of the extinguisher handle

LOCATION AND DISPLAY OF SIGN

  • Minimum of 2000mm above floor level
  • At a point that makes them most apparent to a person of average height & visual acuity
  • The extinguisher or extinguisher sign shall be clearly visible for up to 20 metres on approach
  • The size of the sign shall be determined by location on and distance at which the sign must be legible
  • A minimum of one Pictorial or location sign must be provided above or adjacent to an extinguisher, even if indicating the location of multiple or a mixed group of extinguishers
  • The extinguisher and fire point location signs shall have a symbol, border and letters in white on a red field, complying with Australian Standard (AS) 2700
  • The Australian Standard (AS) 2444 Portable Fire Extinguishers and Fire Blankets selection and location will provide comprehensive and specific information
  • It is also recommended that you have a square instruction disc (ID – SIGN) directly above the extinguisher wall bracket. Even though these details are on the portable fire extinguisher they can get covered up with stickers, etc. blocking theinstructions

21

Firefighting equipment is within test date.

Q: How do I understand the tag? A numeric symbol is marked in the month and year for each inspection and certification.

Q: What do the numeric symbols stand for?

1 – six monthly inspection

2 – yearly inspection

3 – (this numeric symbol is no longer used, the previous Australian Standard has been superseded)

4 – five yearly inspection (pressure testing)

5 – after use service



SHAPE is committed to promote sustainability as an integral part of each project, to encourage better environmental practices among the suppliers and subcontractors we engage, and establish measurable objectives and targets that address our environmental impact.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to environmental aspects and impacts for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

The project Site Specific Induction Handout includes environmental controls specific to the project:

  • Spill control
  • MDF cutting
  • Ventilation – natural or mechanical
  • Dust/sediment suppression
  • Stormwater management
  • Waste water management
  • Noisy works
  • Hazardous Chemicals (refer to the Hazardous Chemicals SMS)
  • Waste Management
  • Flora and fauna

3

Subcontractor SWMS include environmental aspects, impacts and control measures, including requirements for the handling, storage, use and disposal of Hazardous Chemicals in accordance with the SDS.

4

Spill kits are:

  • Fully stocked
  • Appropriate for the scope of works
  • Positioned in the area of risk
  • Sign posted

5

Workers are aware of spill control measures, as outlined in the product’s SDS.

6

MDF cutting:

  • Wherever possible, alternative products to MDF are to be used (e.g. Emissions Zero or EO board, Hoop Pine)
  • If MDF is to be used, MDF cutting is to be completed off site wherever possible
  • If MDF is to be cut or sanded on site, an MDF cutting room has been established in accordance with the Medium Density Fibreboard (MDF) Procedure.
  • MDF cutting rooms are identified with the following signage at the entrance:
    • MDF Cutting Room warning signage
    • Mandatory PPE signage
  • Workers are to wear PPE in accordance with the product SDS
  • Cutting tools will be fitted with a HEPA-vacuum extraction system
  • The room is kept tidy at all times, and dust is bagged for disposal

7

Ventilation:

  • Where natural ventilation is not adequate for the site, mechanical ventilation is used, e.g. extraction fans, pedestal fans, portable air conditioning units, etc.
  • Where existing mechanical services are operational, additional filter media will be installed over air intakes to prevent contamination

8

Appropriate dust/sediment suppression controls are implemented:

  • Water suppression
  • Negative pressure air zones
  • Use of extraction systems with in-built filtration
  • Wet brooming
  • Vacuum equipment

For external works:

  • Water trucks
  • Hydroseeding / spraygrass
  • Stockpile encapsulation
  • Rumble grids / shakedown tracksare in place for vehicle access and egress
  • A road maintenance cleaning program is in place (e.g. street sweepers or similar)

9

Stormwater management controls are implemented when appropriate:

  • Filtration media
  • Filtration socks
  • Hay bales
  • Silt barriers/fences
  • Tarping of waste containers or stockpiles  in adverse weather conditions

10

Waste water management controls are implemented when appropriate:

  • Designated and bunded wet trade mixing areas
  • Wash out systems (e.g. Dulux Envirowash System, Resene WashWise, or similar)
  • Sediment tanks (e.g. for plaster, cement, tiling products, etc.)
  • Waste water is disposed of in accordance with the SDS, and local council or Environmental Authority requirements

 

11

Noisy works controls are implemented when appropriate:

  • Work methods are selected which eliminate or minimise noise generation as much as practical (e.g. placing materials instead of dropping, exhaust silencers are used, sound rated rooms, use of acoustic panelling and other noise dampening materials, cutting rooms, etc.)
  • Plant and Equipment are turned off when not in use
  • Works are in accordance with building management and Development Approval (DA) constraints
  • Noisy works are scheduled at a time that reduces exposure to other workers
  • Where possible, workers are excluded from noisy work locations
  • Neighbours and stakeholders are notified in advance of planned noisy works activities
  • Hearing protection must be worn by workers and others in the vicinity of the noise
  • Noise monitoring and assessment is conducted for repetitive noisy works

12

Monitoring and inspections take place via site walks and Procore Hazard Observations

13

Waste management controls are in place and effective:

  • Waste management strategies are communicated as part of the Site Specific Induction
  • There is an adequate number of bins
  • The size and type of bins are appropriate for the type of waste generated by the scope of works
  • Bins are not overflowing
  • There is a bin exchange or turnover strategy in place, which is communicated at induction
  • A waste tracking and separation plan is in place (NB this is mandatory for all Green Star projects)
  • A housekeeping strategy is in place

14

Paint and/or hazardous products are appropriately managed (i.e. storage, signage, handling and disposal are in accordance with the SDS).

15

Posters or signage highlighting environmental initiatives (e.g. recycling) are displayed on site.

16

Vehicle movements and parking are managed to minimise environmental impact on the neighbourhood and other stakeholders.

17

Sediment fencing is in place where required

18

Flora and fauna controls are implemented when appropriate:

  • Garden beds are protected
  • Trees are adequately protected



The intent of this SMS is to provide management and control guidelines for Excavation and Trenching activities.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to excavation and trenching work for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Contractor Safe Work Method Statements (SWMS) are prepared by subcontractors for construction work associated with work in and around a trench or excavation and reviewed using the SWMS Review. SWMS must detail hazards and controls associated with an excavated depth greater than 1.5 metres and/or the risk of a person falling more than 2 metres.

3

The earthmoving plant selected is suitable for the work being performed, including consideration of the materials, load, frequency, proximity of other plant/structures.

4

A competent person has conducted a documented inspection / risk assessment of the excavation site prior to starting work.

Soil type information must be provided by a geotechnical engineer for trenches and excavations 1.5m or greater in depth and for any excavation
in unstable soil.

5

Before excavating check the soil report for acid sulphate soils – additional risk management may be required.

6

If spoil is to be disposed of to an off-site facility, pre-excavation soil testing will be required for the purposes of a waste classification assessment (engage a hygienist).

7

Relevant information, training, and instructions have been provided to workers who are involved in the activity. For example; Site Specific Induction, Toolbox Talks, training in SWMS, Pre-Start Meetings, etc.

8

For all excavation activities – on public or private land “Dial before you Dig” must be contacted.

Note: Dial Before You Dig is a free enquiry service for information on underground assets anywhere in Australia.

9

Information about underground services is communicated to workers involved in the excavation work – including when it is not in the immediate vicinity. Where this is risk of damage to services, alternative excavation methods should be considered (e.g. hydro or vacuum excavation).

10

An adequate consultation / communication process must be conducted with all relevant parties prior to the excavation work commencing.

11

Where the excavation is located near other plant or structures, control measures are in place to prevent injury to workers and members of public.

12

Following the Planning and Risk Assessment of Trenching and excavation activities an Excavation Permit must be completed and issued to the subcontractor directly involved with the works prior to work commencing.

13

When the cutting or coring of concrete is required prior to the excavating, the Cutting and Coring Concrete and Masonry Elements Procedure
must be implemented.

14

Ground penetrating radar (GPR) scanning is completed prior to commencing excavations –  Include visual inspections of areas to be excavated for tell-tale signs of underground services such as sunken trench lines, service pits, and surface mounted lighting poles, above ground electrical pillars.

15

Appropriate exclusion zones and warning signs are established around excavations and plant and equipment paths of travel.

16

Where ground support systems are required / installed, or battering of trench is used, ensure there is a safe system of work in place to minimise the risk of injury for people installing and removing the system.

17

The risk of people falling into the excavation has been adequately controlled through use of barriers – this should include provisions to prevent unauthorised access afterhours. Certified barriers are required where work is in the immediate vicinity of the live edge.

18

A safe means of access and egress from the trench or excavation has been provided.

19

The risk of people being struck by falling objects must be adequately controlled.

20

All additional task and site specific hazards or risks associated with the excavation work must be adequately managed.

This has been addressed in the project Risk Register and communicated through the Site Specific Induction.

21

Monitoring of trenching an excavation activities is completed via the Task Inspection. The presence of asbestos must also be considered in areas known to have been filled or past building sites.



Construction work involves a number of high risk activities and the use of potentially dangerous plant and equipment, which if operated while fatigued can result in serious injury or even death. The following Minimum Standards are provided to ensure the safety of everyone impacted by our construction work - including ourselves, our co-workers, clients, tenants and the general public.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to the potential impact of fatigue for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

In the development of the Project Delivery Plan, project teams are to agree on standard working hours, conditions and timeframes that are appropriate for the project and client, contractors and SHAPE workers themselves.

3

Risk assess project resourcing requirements regularly depending on the nature and scope of current works.

4

Coordinate trades to schedule similar out of hours works together (e.g. core holing activities), rather than on multiple separate occasions.

5

When planning for out of hours works, consideration should be given to avoiding high risk activities in the closing hours of the shift. Workers are generally more alert and focused at the start of the shift and better equipped to follow instructions and make sound decisions.

6

Proactively discuss and manage fatigue with the workforce, particularly after emergency events or significant incidents have occurred which may result in workers working longer shifts – ensure supervisors manage this proactively with their resourcing.

7

When appropriate, communication to subcontractors about management of fatigue with their workers is documented in an email and records of this communication are retained.

8

Ensure fatigue is included in your subcontractor’s SWMS, particularly for safety critical activities.

9

Ensure that all workers on the construction site (including subcontractors) have been given the site specific induction, and made aware of the requirements of the Project Delivery Plan.

10

Provide adequate facilities for rest breaks (e.g. lunch room, amenities).

11

Incident Reports should be raised for instances where fatigued workers have been identified on site, or particularly where there was potential for workers performing high risk work (safety critical activities) also being fatigued.



The erection, use and dismantling of formwork and falsework is high risk work. Formwork is the surface of the form and framing used to contain and shape wet concrete until it is self-supporting. Falsework is the temporary structure used to support a permanent structure, material, plant, equipment and people until the construction of the permanent structure has advanced to the stage where it is self-supporting.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of work involving the erection of formwork, falsework and placement of concrete and stripping for inclusion in the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Design of all formwork meets the requirements of AS 3610 Formwork for Concrete, and considers:

  • The type of formwork such as conventional or proprietary systems;
  • Components to be used e.g. size and shape;
  • Configuration of the system;
  • Conditions of the site, e.g. ground conditions prevailing weather;
  • Stability of formwork during erection, pouring and dismantling;
  • Using off-site construction methods such as concrete girders lifted into place in lieu of in-situ form;
  • Minimisation of working at heights;
  • Fall protection provisions;
  • Guiderails;
  • Sloping surfaces on formwork;
  • Manual handling.

3

Design safety reports have been received and recommendations have been included into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan. They are then distributed to the formwork contractor for inclusion into their safe system of work.

4

Systems of work developed by the formwork contractor should be clear but flexible to meet changing circumstances as the work progresses. The system of work should provide for the assessment and control of any new risks arising from proposed changes to the work before they are implemented.

A documented safe system of work can be an administrative control that complements higher level controls. This could include the following:

  • communication and consultation;
  • a project risk assessment;
  • Safe Work Method Statements for high risk construction work;
  • access and egress;
  • exclusion zones;
  • permit-to-work systems;
  • fall arrest / restraint systems;
  • inspection and maintenance;
  • emergency evacuation arrangements;
  • changes to the work arrangements.

5

Prior to commencing formwork operations, the following steps have been carried out:

  • Site-specific Safe Work Method Statements have been reviewed and in place
  • Suitable access in and out of the formwork zone is in place for workers and mobile plant;
  • The ground conditions where formwork is placed has been assessed by a competent person (e.g. a geotechnical engineer) and is adequate to support the weight of the formwork and concrete and any additional live loads such as pumps, workers, mixers, pouring of concrete and so on;
  • Loading plans have been developed and established for loading of materials and plant;
  • Unauthorised persons are prevented from entering the work area. This includes physical barriers and hazard warning signs clearly displayed around formwork activities to warn other persons/trades on site;
  • Electrical hazards (overhead and underground) has been identified and controlled;
  • Emergency response plans have been documented and tested;
  • All persons carrying out the work have received appropriate training, information and instruction;
  • All proprietary formwork components and formwork materials such as joists, bearers, plywood, support frames, jacks and U heads are used in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications;
  • Proprietary connecting devices and props pins are used. Improvised bolts and or reinforcing steel must not be used for this purpose.

6

Emergency plans consider:

  • The method for alerting workers in an emergency;
  • The method of extracting workers from each location or cell that people have entry to or could fall into;
  • When to evacuate workers from the form;
  • Evacuation muster points both on and off the form;
  • Location and use of fire extinguishers;
  • Identifying workers responsible for ensuring evacuation takes place;
  • Rescue procedures for severe medical conditions;
  • Damaged componentry/components;
  • Notifying emergency service organisations at the earliest opportunity;
  • Establishing communication protocols between relevant workers;
  • Testing emergency procedures for their effectiveness in dealing with an emergency;
  • Frequency of emergency drill testing;
  • Providing information, instruction and training to workers who may be affected by an emergency.

7

Erection of formwork is documented into a Safe Work Method Statement:

  • Formwork frames are erected progressively to ensure the installers’ safety and the stability of the overall structure;
  • Bracing is progressively installed to provide reasonable fall protection during erection;
  • Bracing is not used as final edge protection;
  • Where erecting the formwork requires people to stand at heights of two (2) metres or more above a level below, form workers can work within the formwork frame provided there is fall protection provided within the frame. An example of this would be to construct a temporary platform within the frame’s tower with the cross bracing or handrail installed to the sides enclosing the frame on four sides;
  • The false deck is constructed so there are no large gaps and gaps only exist where a vertical member of a frame passes through the deck. Gaps do not exceed 225mm in width;
  • Safe access is provided to each of the false decks;

  • Intermediate work decks are installed for erection of formwork above 4 meters above the below floor;
  • Where the potential fall distance is less than two metres, a catch platform or catch deck can be provided that is at least 450mmwide, which is not a working deck.

8

  • Bearers are placed on frames by workers off work platforms no more than 1800mm below them;
  • Bearers are held in place using U heads, the bearer is positioned in the centre of the U head;

  • U heads are rotated and fixed by nailing or wedging the bearer to prevent the bearer from moving off the centre of the U head. Where 2 bearers abut the U head does not need to be rotated;
  • Joints are installed to the bearer from below using a work deck progressively;
  • Formwork deck is laid in a progressive way so that workers will be provided with a method to prevent them from falling below the deck;
  • Workers start laying the form ply sheets from the perimeter scaffolding or other edge protection provided on the perimeter of the formwork;
  • A minimum of four joists at 450mm centres—400mm gaps, totalling 1.8 metres—are located on bearers next to the person and in the other direction joists extend for at least 1.8 metres. Therefore, if a person falls they will fall onto the joists and should be prevented from falling further;
  • Lower areas of the deck (beams or drop downs) are constructed first to minimise fall hazards from higher levels of the deck.

9

  • Leading edge hazards are documented in the formwork contractor’s SWMS;
  • Task Inspections are completed on all tasks undertaken by the formwork contractor.

10

  • Formwork is inspected by a structural engineer at key stages of the construction of the formwork:
    • With formwork components;
    • Reinforcement;
    • Equipment;
    • Pre stressed tendons and prior to completion;
  •  A structural engineer inspects and confirms installed formwork and falsework meets the design specification and is structurally sound before it is loaded with concrete;
  • A pre pour certificate is issued by the structural engineer before loading with concrete;
  • Any alterations or amendments to the formwork are inspected and approved by the structural engineer.

11

Safe access and egress to the formwork has been provided and may include:

  • Fit for purpose temporary ramps (cleated);
  • Secured planks on top of steel reinforcement to provide safe access and egress from completed formwork decks;
  • Using the existing floor level of a building, where entry is safe;
  • Installing temporary stairs or portable ladder access systems for use when erecting the formwork and falsework;
  • Personnel hoists – non-mechanical forms of exit (e.g. a ladder or stair tower should also be provided in case of power failure or another emergency);
  • Appropriate safe access to safely remove injured and ill workers.

12

  • Barriers are in place to prevent other trades such as steel fixers, plumbers and electricians from the formwork erection zone;
  • Formwork has been inspected and the work zone has been deemed safe for other trades.

13

Controls for falling objects are in place such as:

  • Overhead protective structures;
  • Perimeter protection screens;
  • Catch platforms;
  • Catch nets;
  • Exclusions zones below.

14

  • Designated material set down areas are established for materials;
  • Material set down areas have been approved by the structural engineer;
  • Stored material is not overloading the formwork

15

  • Penetrations on the formwork deck are covered by fit for purpose material and secured in position, clearly visible and identified or have leading or perimeter edge protection;
  • Open penetrations like stairwells or access for services have proprietary guarding installed;
  • Penetrations in concrete slabs have cast-in-mesh as a back-up system;
  • The mesh is 50 x 50mm mesh size or smaller and made of material capable of withstanding the potential imposed loads. Where mesh or other physical fall protection material is to be provided for larger penetrations this should be included in the slab design specifications to ensure it can withstand potential loads including those applied by people, equipment and material;
  • Penetration covers using plywood material should be structurally graded and identified using a bright colour paint. The cover must be firmly secured to the concrete or formwork deck and designed for potential loads that may be applied;
  • Before stripping formwork, penetrations cast into the concrete are covered;
  • Joists placed up to the edge of the penetration are secured so the timbers cannot spread if a person falls on them.

16

  • Guardrails used for edge protection have been designed and engineered as edge protection systems in accordance with AS 4994: Temporary edge protection – general requirements;
  • Guardrails and handrails generally incorporate a top rail between 900mm and 1100mm above the working surface and also incorporate a mid-rail and a toe board (except where it may be impractical to do so) and alternative control measures, such as exclusion or ‘no go’ zones, to ensure no one is at risk of being hit by falling objects from the work above;
  • Fixings used to secure posts to the deck should be fit for purpose and take into account that it must be able to withstand the force of a worker falling into the rail.

17

  • Perimeter protection screens are an effective means of edge protection on a
    completed formwork deck. Perimeter protection screens may be installed on the
    formwork as it is constructed, in which case the formwork must be designed to
    support the screens;
  • Perimeter screens:
    • Extend at least 1000mm above the finished floor level;
    • Have the ability to support or contain imposed impact loads including building materials, equipment and waste materials;
    • Have resistance to wind loads on the supporting structure;
    • Are regularly inspected;
    • Are resistant to chemical reactivity including flammability;
    • Are ventilated;
    • Allow light transmission;
    • Provide a degree of protection from rain or washing down operations;
    • Have a pattern and frequency of fixing points;
    • Have gaps between the screen and formwork or slab less than 50mm;
    • Where gaps exceed 50mm, additional temporary measures such as flaps and covers are used;
  • Perimeter protection screens should be assembled, installed and operated by the holder of a rigging high-risk work licence who has received training from the screen manufacturer/supplier.

18

  • The formwork contractor has a monitoring regime of the formwork in place during concrete placement to check for potential failures or collapse and to check that formwork movement does not exceed the specifications;
  • There is a documented communication system in place to alert others of potential issues;
  • The formwork contractor has workers available to carry out any emergency adjustments or repairs;
  • Placement is stopped whilst repair or adjustments are carried out;
  • Pour rate of concrete does not exceed the calculated rate;
  • Hoists, pumps and other equipment required for the pour are not fixed to the formwork without approval by the structural engineer.

19

  • A documented back propping design is in place and approved by the structural engineer prior to stripping;
  • Written confirmation has been received prior to stripping that the structure is self-supporting and stripping can commence;
  • Concrete test results have been received verifying concrete meets the design specification.

20

A written methodology is in place for the stripping of the formwork including:

  • The number of people involved;
  • Establishment of exclusion zones;
  • The sequence of stripping activities – usually the reverse order of installation;
  • Cleaning and removal of nails and sharps;
  • Stacking of material;
  • Minimising damage to the components;
  • Identification of dedicated walkways;
  • Formwork components are not dropped or thrown from a building or structure;
  • Where back-propping is required;
  • How the structural members will remain in place and the type and layout of members that will replace the formwork system;
  • Other special requirements involved in the stripping or building process, e.g. checking of back-propping after post-tensioning;
  • Providing lighting for the work area and surroundings;
  • Maintaining housekeeping



The use of Hazardous Chemicals often occurs out of convenience rather than necessity – for the purpose of this SMS the emphasis should be on use of alternative, non-hazardous products wherever possible.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to Hazardous Chemicals for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

A site specific Hazardous Chemicals Register is maintained on site.

3

Safety Data Sheets, also known as SDS’s, are current (i.e. less than 5 years old), have an Australian or New Zealand contact phone number listed on page 1, and are filed in a dedicated SDS folder which is kept next to the first aid kit.
NB – SDSs must also be kept for all non-hazardous products, where there are specific PPE and first aid requirements.

4

The subcontractor has provided a risk assessment for the product, OR SDS controls are detailed in SWMS, Toolbox Talk or Pre-Start Meeting.

5

All substances are clearly labelled and stored in their original containers.
NB – Decanting of substances into smaller containers is only permitted under the conditions outlined in Safe Work Australia’s Code of Practice for the Labelling of Workplace Hazardous Chemicals.

6

Flammable substances are stored in a ventilated area and away from ignition sources, with the required emergency response equipment located within the area.

7

The required first aid facilities are available and have been assessed to provide first response in the event of an exposure.

8

The handling, storage, use and disposal of all Hazardous Chemicals is conducted in accordance with the SDS.

9

Adequate ventilation has been provided to avoid a concentration of fumes. This may involve:

  • Windows and doors being opened where possible
  • The introduction of mechanical ventilation or extraction
  • Using the building extraction system

NB – concentration of fumes can affect not only workers but also building tenants, via contamination of the mechanical services system and/or air displacement through operational lift shafts. Extra caution must be taken when working on a multi-tenanted floor.

10

Consideration should be given to the use of Hazardous Chemicals out of hours to reduce the frequency of exposure for other workers and tenants.



Hot works are a regular activity on SHAPE projects. Planning of friction cutting, welding, brazing and other heat producing activities is essential.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to hot works activities for inclusion the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

The building management and tenancy fitout guide has also been reviewed to ensure the inclusion of building management requirements for hot works – i.e. impairment notices, building specific controls, notification periods, fire services isolation requirements, etc.

3

Following the development of the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan all relevant information in relation to hot works is detailed within the project Site Specific Induction.

4

Subcontractor SWMS are reviewed via the SWMS Review to ensure hot works activities, hazards and controls including emergency response plans have been addressed when appropriate.

5

Where hot works activities are undertaken, consideration should be given to work benches, waste bins, fire extinguishers, permit holders, brooms, dust pans, etc. which are negotiated with subcontractors.

6

Hot Work Permits are in use for any activity that may generate heat, fire, smoke, or if there is a risk of combustion.

7

Consideration is given to fire bans and weather conditions when completing external hot works.

8

Fire extinguishers and fire blankets must be provided by the subcontractor undertaking the hot works.

9

Fire extinguishers are suitable for the task being performed and located within the immediate vicinity of personnel performing hot work activities.
NB – when working at heights, the fire extinguisher must be located within the EWP basket or on the scaffold platform, etc.

10

Fire extinguishers are within test date (within 6 months of the last date stamp).

11

Base building or client fire extinguishers should not be used except in emergencies (e.g. not to be used by subcontractors for hot works activities).

12

Flashback arrestors are fitted to gas torch leads (both the hand piece and at the bottles).

13

Flashback arrestors on hoses have been installed, and have been tested or replaced at intervals of at least every 12 months.

14

Records of inspection or maintenance should be provided by the subcontractor when requested. One means of compliance may be to tag or attach stickers to oxy fuel gas equipment that has been inspected and tested.

15

Gas hoses and fittings are in good condition.

16

Welding equipment is in good working order.

17

Adequate ventilation is provided or is available for welding activities.

18

Welding screens are provided for Arc, MIG & TIG welding activities.

19

Warning signage is posted to advise others of potential hazards.

20

Areas below overhead welding / hot works are isolated with exclusion zones and signage.

21

Combustible material has been removed or is protected from hot work.

22

Protection measures are in place to prevent sparks or debris entering
public areas.

23

Where hot works are undertaken via height access equipment (e.g. EWPs), consideration has been given to protecting internal components from heat affected falling debris which may ignite an equipment fire.

24

A minimum 30 minute fire watch is coordinated for all hot work activities.
NB – some clients may require a longer duration fire watch as part of their own, or building management requirements.

25

Cylinders are stored in accordance with manufacture requirements, if overnight then correct storage in an approved cage has been allocated space on
the project.

26

The storage of gas cylinders on site should be limited to those cylinders in active use, rather than bulk-storage. i.e. there is a regular exchange program in place.
NB – empty gas cylinders should be removed from site within 24 hours.

27

PPE is being used in accordance with controls listed in the contractor’s SWMS & the Hot Work Permit.



Lasers are commonly used for alignment, levelling, control and survey tasks for construction work. Each state’s health and safety Regulations impose certain requirements in relation to the safe use of laser equipment at the workplace.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to the use of lasers for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Qualified and trained personnel are assigned to install, adjust and operate the laser equipment. This person is also responsible for the implementation of laser safety controls. Verify competency via Certificate of Competency, related trade or industry qualification.

3

Appropriate laser warning signs are posted in areas in which these lasers are used.

4

Precautions are taken to ensure that persons do not look directly into the beam, e.g. placement of the laser at floor level or above ceiling level.

5

Precautions are taken to ensure that the beam is not viewed directly through optical instruments.

6

Appropriate eye protection is worn, e.g. specific laser safety eyewear.

7

The laser beam is terminated at the end of its useful beam path.

8

Precautions are taken to ensure that the laser beam is not unintentionally directed at mirror-like or specular surfaces (especially flat or concave mirror-like surfaces).

9

The equipment is being used in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions and contractor’s Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS). This has been assessed through the SHAPE Task Inspection.

10

When not in use, is the laser equipment stored in a location where unauthorised persons cannot gain access.

11

Class 3B and Class 4 lasers are not used without completion of a project specific risk assessment, which involves the SHAPE EHSQ team.



Detailed planning for Lifting Operations will ensure worker safety and deliver project quality and efficiency outcomes.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to lifting operations for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Permits have been applied for through the relevant councils, police and road & traffic authority.

3

A competent person has determined the type of crane to be suitable for the lifting work to be performed.

4

A SWMS (including a documented emergency response plan) has been received, and the SWMS Review has been completed.

5

A reliable method of communication between the crane operator and dogger(s) has been documented in the SWMS.

6

Relevant information, training, and instructions have been provided to all workers who are involved in the activity. For example: Site Specific Induction, Record of Toolbox Talk, training in SWMS, Pre-Start Meeting.

7

The annual inspection is current, and a record is kept on file.

8

If the crane is ten years or older, the major inspection certificate is available for inspection and kept on file.

9

The Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment been completed.

10

Crane Operators involved hold the required high-risk work licence for the class of crane being used. Copies of high risk work licences are kept on file.

11

Dogmen and Riggers involved hold the required high-risk work licence. Copies of the licences are kept on file.

12

Lifting procedures and plans define responsibility and approach the crane lift in a logical, systematic way.

13

The crane operator manual and crane load chart are available in the cab and written in English.

14

Factors have been considered that could affect the ability of the ground to provide adequate support (e.g. underground services, trenches, excavations, pits, tanks).

15

Where hazards have been identified in point 13, certification has been provided by a competent person that the surface has adequate bearing capacity to support the crane (e.g. structural engineer, geotech engineer, scanning techniques).

16

When a crane is positioned near a trench, the nearest outrigger to the trench must be at least as far away from the trench, as the trench is deep. This rule assumes a zone of influence working at a 45° angle.

17

Assessment of the size and complexity of the lifts has been completed to determine resourcing. The Subcontractors involved have confirmed that adequate resourcing will be provided.

18

A Lifting Operations Permit has been issued.

19

The operator has carried out a documented pre-operational inspection on the crane prior to starting the day’s work.

20

Public and site Traffic Management Plans are implemented for all movements of the crane, e.g. exclusion zones, barriers, signage, traffic controllers.

21

The crane is positioned so that the risk of injury/property damage from collision with other plant or structures is eliminated.

22

The crane is positioned so that the risk of lifting loads over public areas has been eliminated, or otherwise adequately controlled.

23

Wind conditions have been considered in relation to how they may affect the crane’s stability.

24

The timbers, pads or bog mats used under the outriggers or stabilisers are appropriate for the type of crane and ground conditions.

25

The lifting gear is in good condition, is of adequate capacity for the task, and is appropriately marked with a ‘Safe Working Load’.

26

A visual inspection of all lifting equipment is conducted by a competent person daily before each use (i.e. a licensed Dogman or Rigger). This visual inspection should assess all chains, hooks, slings, spreader bars and chain rings. The inspection should focus on identifying any defects or deformities such as:

  • stiff or frozen hammer locks
  • stiffening of the internal material of soft slings
  • deformed, stretched or crushed chain links
  • cracks, cuts, nicks, burns, gouges, weld splatter or other damage to chain links or chain lifting rings
  • damaged hooks or damaged hook safety latches
  • wear or cuts to soft slings
  • soft sling damage caused by abrasion or caustic substances

27

Lifting equipment (e.g. vacuum cup lifting frames) must be inspected and maintained in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions. Records of inspections must be kept on file.

 

28

A documented emergency response trial has been completed. Emergency equipment is in place as per the emergency rescue plan.

29

Outriggers are extended in accordance with the manufacturer’s load charts.
NOTE: partially extended outriggers may or may not be permitted according to the manufacturer’s load charts. This must be verified on each occasion.

30

The slinging technique used is in accordance with the lifting plan or other works methodologies.

31

Pick-and-carry activities are in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications (e.g. sloping or uneven ground can cause rollover).

32

Ground assessed and inspected to ensure that continuous operation of the crane has not compressed the ground that further operation of the crane will be unsafe.

33

A Task Inspection has been completed for monitoring compliance with the SWMS.



Manual Tasks are not just about heavy lifting. They encompass a wide range of activities including lifting, pushing, pulling, holding, throwing and carrying. Even repetitive tasks such as office administration tasks, packing, cleaning and sorting, using hand-tools, operating machinery and equipment are all considered manual tasks.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to manual tasks for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Elimination of manual tasks are considered as part of the control measures, e.g. design review, pre-fabricating components off-site, changing work methodologies, using plant to lift items, etc.

3

Subcontractors undertaking manual tasks have addressed the hazards and appropriate controls within their SWMS. Subcontractor SWMS are reviewed via the SWMS Review.

4

Workers have undergoing training and instruction on manual handling techniques, for example: as part of their trade qualifications, training in SWMS controls, on-site training through Toolbox Talks and Pre-Start Meetings, or task-specific competency based training through an external provider.

5

Mechanical aids are considered as part of manual handling control measures, e.g. trolley, sheet lifter, duct lifter, pallet jack, gin wheel, davit arm, winch, block and tackle, etc.

6

Group lifting techniques are employed for heavy or awkward loads.

7

Materials and equipment are delivered as close as possible to site to reduce manual handling activities and durations.

8

Timing for deliveries is coordinated to allow best possible access to shortest paths of travel.

9

Access routes are maintained clear and free of trip hazards.

10

Repetitive tasks are rotated and task durations reduced to reduce the frequency of exposure.

11

Task-specific PPE has been identified and is being used, e.g. back braces, lifting straps, knee pads at low levels.

12

Workers are fit for work and have advised of pre-existing medical conditions in the Site Specific Induction Record.



The definition of Minor Works is broad and varied and cannot be determined by cost alone. Minor Works is categorised through assessment of the complexity of work / tasks to be performed, project and site logistics, duration / staging, contract arrangements, WHS risk, reputational risk and desired commercial outcomes. Therefore the State General Manager and Manager responsible for delivery of the works will determine the delivery method during the bid and pre-construction phases with the aid of the bid review process, and consideration of the project scope and risk profile.


1

Risk Registers – A project specific risk profile and risk register will be developed for all minor projects.
NB an overarching Project Risk Register may be established to manage ongoing minor works activities within a specific building, location or for a specific client with the proviso that the risk register is reviewed and updated as required for each separate minor works activity. The review process will be demonstrated (regardless if changes are required or not) via the initialling and dating of the document within the review column.

2

Safety in Design – the SHAPE manager responsible must:

  • Request design risk assessments from all design disciplines for review and inclusion into the project Risk Register as required.
  • Coordinate and conduct overarching design risk reviews with key stakeholders in accordance with the SHAPE Design Risk Assessment and Procore Project Delivery System (PDS) workflows.

3

Project Delivery Plan (PDP) – a project specific Project Delivery Plan will be established for all minor works projects.
NB an overarching Project Delivery Plan may be established to manage ongoing minor works activities within a specific building, location or for a specific client with the proviso that the plan is reviewed for each separate minor works project / contract.

Project Delivery Plan reviews will be demonstrated by completing the “Review History” table on each occasion.
NB in addition to review and update of the Project Delivery Plan for each separate minor works project / contract the Project Delivery Plan will be reviewed regularly with respect to document control and revision currency.

4

SWMS – All contractors must provide a project specific SWMS for high risk activities as defined by legislation or a documented SHAPE risk assessment– refer to the SWMS/SSOW Procedure. A SWMS Review must be completed for all SWMS submitted for high risk works.

SSOW – for works not defined as high risk by legislation or a documented SHAPE risk assessment, a SSOW such as a safety plan, risk assessment, Safe Operating Procedure (SOP), methodology or other form of safe system of work must be submitted by the subcontractor and reviewed in accordance with the SWMS/SSOW Procedure using the SSOW Review.

The responsible manager will complete reviews of all SWMS and SSOW and provide feedback to the relevant suppliers or subcontractors via the Procore Observations or Submittals tools.

5

Site Specific Induction – All workers are to be inducted via a project specific induction using the Site Specific Induction and Site Specific Induction Record.
NB the induction handout document may be developed to manage ongoing minor works activities within a specific building, location or for a specific client with the proviso that the induction handout & record documents are reviewed prior to each separate minor works project / contract being delivered to ensure details are current and relevant.
NB – in addition to review and update of the Site Specific Induction for each separate minor works project / contract the document will be reviewed regularly with respect to document control and revision currency.

6

Communication and Consultation – project specific arrangements will be detailed within the Site Specific Induction for projects with less than 10 workers – a copy of the induction handout will be made available on site at all times.

When the Record of Toolbox Talk – Communication and Consultation is not used, a question will be added to the Site Specific Induction Record document confirming workers agree to and understand the site communication and consultation process.

NB projects with 10 or more workers over several consecutive days must use the Record of Toolbox Talk – Communication and Consultation template within the first two weeks of project commencement and display the relevant Communication and Consultation Arrangements signage on site.

7

Project Supervision – All SHAPE projects must be supervised – the level of supervision required will be determined via completion of the project Risk Profile and Risk Register with consideration of the following:

  • Residual risk for each project task / activity – high risk activities will generally require full SHAPE supervision
  • Nature of work being performed – demolition / disruptive work will generally require full SHAPE supervision
  • Number of workers on site
  • Risk of reputational damage
  • Risk of client complaints
  • Contractual agreements with respect to supervision
  • Tender submission commitments with respect to supervision
  • Public interface
  • Security arrangements
  • First Aid requirements
  • Emergency evacuation requirements
  • Available emergency contacts
  • Availability & distance from site for nominated SHAPE contacts

8

Electrical Protection Plan – requirements for an electrical protection plan will be determined via the project Risk Profile & Risk Register prior to commencing on site.

NB an Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”) is required when work is to be performed in proximity of live electrical services, including all work within voids, bulkheads, ceilings, risers, wall cavities, raised access floors and demolition work.

Examples where an electrical protection plan may not be required: replacing floor finishes, replacing or placing furniture items, painting, glazing film, hanging a door to an existing opening, etc.

9

The Electrical Safety Procedure & Minimum Standards – are applicable at all times with respect to management of electrical hazards and the use of power and lighting for trade activities.

NB where an Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”) is deemed not required following completion of the project Risk Register then the electrical safety controls for the project are to be documented within the project Risk Register and Site Specific Induction.

10

First Aid Equipment – may be provided by SHAPE, or the use of existing equipment may be risk assessed when the client or building management have suitable & accessible equipment available.

NB prior permission must be sought when nominating client or building management first aid equipment.

11

Emergency Evacuation Diagrams – SHAPE developed plans are not required when the current building or tenancy diagrams remain relevant during the project.
NB SHAPE must provide updated emergency evacuation diagrams when works interfere with paths of travel and access ways.

12

Emergency Response – certain high risk activities will require SHAPE or the subcontractor to develop emergency response plans, e.g. work in proximity of live electrical services, work at heights, confined spaces, asbestos removal, excavations, lifting activities, etc.
NB refer to your Project Risk Register for activities defined as high risk.

13

Permits – all SHAPE permits relevant to the scope of works are required to be completed – refer to relevant SMS subjects

14

Project Site Folders – the standard SHAPE (5) site folder arrangement is not required for minor works projects, however all hard copy / signed documents and forms must be managed in a single site folder as a minimum and returned to the state or territory office for archiving on completion of the project. Electronic documents are to be stored within the relevant Procore project files.

15

Hazardous Substances / Chemicals – Where the use of hazardous substances/chemicals cannot be avoided and the anticipated number of products to be used is 5 or less the SHAPE Hazardous Chemicals Register is not required. Copies of each SDS will be attached to subcontractor SWMS or Safe System of Work (SSOW).
NB the SHAPE manager responsible for the works is required to ensure an SDS is available on site at all times for all hazardous chemicals. The hazards and controls for the chemical must also be detailed within the contractor SWMS or a separate Risk Assessment for Hazardous Chemicals for the product.

16

Plant and Equipment – A Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment must be completed for all plant and equipment used on site. Refer to the SHAPE Plant and Equipment Procedure and SMS for further details.

17

Plant and Equipment Register – There is no requirement for a Plant and Equipment Register when there will be no more than 2 items of designated plant and equipment on site over the life of the project.

18

Asbestos Management – all standard requirements for asbestos management apply to minor works – refer to the Asbestos Management SMS and Asbestos Management Procedure.

19

Site Entry Signage – is required for all minor works.

20

Head Policies Noticeboards – are required for all projects that run for 10 or more consecutive business days in duration. For all other minor works the SHAPE WHS, Industrial Relations, Return to Work and Environmental policies are to be appended to the Site Specific Induction Handout document.

21

First Aid Contacts and Nearest Medical Centre / Hospital details – will be provided on the site noticeboards and detailed within the Site Specific Induction Handout.
Alternatives to providing the information on a noticeboard for projects with a less than 10 consecutive business day duration:

  • Where SHAPE has a first aid kit on site the contacts information can be attached to the first aid kit.
  • If client or building management first aid equipment is nominated then a copy of the Site Specific Induction Handout will include the first aid and medical services contact details and be made available at the location of the first aid equipment.

22

Firefighting Equipment – the project Risk Profile and Project Risk Register will determine the project requirements for firefighting equipment.
In some instances it may be determined that existing building equipment is suitable for use with no other SHAPE provided firefighting equipment required.
All relevant firefighting equipment, whether SHAPE or existing building equipment, must be detailed within the Project Delivery Plan.
NB subcontractors involved in hot works will be required to provide their own suitable firefighting equipment. Refer to the SHAPE Hot Works Procedure and Hot Works SMS.

23

Site Offices – a site office will be established wherever practical in line with client and SHAPE expectations.
A site office may not be required:

  • for short duration works, i.e. less than 10 consecutive business days; or
  • when full time SHAPE site supervision is risk assessed as not required; or
  • for certain works within occupied tenancies; or
  • when the SHAPE manager responsible has office facilities available in another location.

24

Lunch Rooms / Facilities – where existing facilities are available and approved for SHAPE and subcontractor use by the client or other relevant stakeholders, these arrangements will be deemed to meet SHAPE requirements.
NB in some circumstances following consultation with the workforce involved it may be suitable to utilise public / commercial facilities, i.e. food court or similar.

25

Site Diary – must be completed in Procore.

26

Site Sign In / Out register – a register will be in place at all times for emergency response and site diary labour hour collection where 10 or more workers are on site at any given time.
Alternatively for low risk minor works activities the daily prestart meeting document may be used as a record of attendance combined with other forms of notification, e.g. text messages and/or phone records, etc.

27

Project Monitoring / Inspections
All hazard observations will be logged in Procore.
Task Observations will be completed for all high risk activities.
Site Inspection Checklists will be completed for all projects over 10 consecutive business days’ duration

28

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – All SHAPE PPE requirements must be adhered to at all times.

29

Daily Prestart meetings – all subcontractors must complete a Daily Prestart meeting.

30

Toolbox Talks – will be completed as a minimum weekly for all projects over 10 consecutive business days’ duration.

31

Subcontractor meetings – the requirement and frequency for formal subcontractor meetings will be determined by the Project Risk Profile and will be documented within the Project Risk Register.

32

Client PCG meetings – will take place in line with client expectations.

33

Design Meetings – the frequency of design meetings will be determined by the Project Risk Profile and will be documented within the Project Risk Register.

34

Document Control – all project documentation will be managed in accordance with the SHAPE Document Control and Record Management Procedure.



Creation of penetrations through reinforced concrete building elements are generally considered structural demolition. Examples of the types of penetrations relevant to this SMS include but are not limited to stair, lift and riser penetrations. Other types of penetrations such as core holes are addressed in the Cutting and Coring SMS. Particular requirements are needed to ensure the penetration is created safely and meets the design. This SMS is to be read in conjunction the Structural Demolition and Alteration SMS, and the Cutting and Coring SMS.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to the penetration requirements, for inclusion into the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Examples of penetrations may include:

  • Creation of stair penetrations
  • Creation of lift shafts
  • Creation of openings (e.g. for windows and doors) within load and non-load bearing walls
  • Creation of services shafts.

3

The following legal requirements have been reviewed and considered:

  • Any statutory, regulatory, or other legal impediments that may prevent the penetration
  • Permit applications, approvals, certificates, notifications, etc. have been submitted to the relevant authorities
  • The owner/principal is legally empowered to have the penetration made
  • The owner/principal has provided all existing architectural, services and engineering drawings available for the demolition project
  • Tender/contract documents are sufficient and complete.

4

A review of the drawings has been conducted to identify:

  • The principle structural materials (e.g. masonry, steel, concrete) in the roof, floor, columns, and internal and external walls
  • Any secondary materials (non-structural) in ceilings, wall-panelling, partitions and floor finishes
  • The location of service supply mains (water, electricity, gas) and the extent of reticulations
  • The location of emergency services (fire detection and firefighting)
  • Other services (sewage, drainage, air conditioning, lifts)
  • Identification of temporary support systems engineering required during demolition works
  • Additional structural members required to support the completed penetration.

5

A structural engineer has been engaged to provide advice on bracing, propping, needle works and overall works methodology.

6

The existing structural system has been checked for deterioration and this is documented in the dilapidation report.

7

A Permit to Cut or Core has been prepared and includes the following actions:

  • Dial before you dig has been consulted and service provider drawings obtained where on ground slabs are to be removed
  • A service search/detection contractor has been engaged to verify and locate structural elements such as reinforcement steel, tendons, beam locations and slab step downs
  • Cast in or underground services have been identified and located, and their points of entry to and exit through the penetration location.

8

The location, nature and condition of all hazardous materials identified in the Hazardous Materials Audit been identified on site.

9

The need for, and the extent of, any required edge protection, security fencing or hoarding has been determined and implemented.

Certified edge protection or engineered cover are installed prior to the removal of falsework or catch decks.

Edge protection must be appropriate to control the risk of falls, i.e. the height of edge protection must take into consideration the use of ladders and trestles in proximity of the penetration, or controls have been put in place to prevent the use of ladders near the penetration if edge protection is chosen as the live edge control.

Note: fire rated hoardings may be required for multiple level stair penetrations.

Full height edge protection eliminates the “live edge” risk presented by the use of platform ladders in the vicinity and allows work to be performed at soffit level in close proximity of the penetration.

10

A works methodology has been developed based on the documentation and site investigations. The methodology has a level-by-level procedure for:

  • Setting out and verification of the position of the penetration
  • Removal of services around the penetration
  • Truncation of tendons in the slab, if present
  • Installation of form/falsework
  • Inspection and certification of form/falsework prior to cutting
  • Cutting and removal of the slab
  • Installation of edge protection
  • Removal of form/falsework
  • Any other required steps

The methodology has been reviewed using the SHAPE SWMS/SSOW Review.

Tendons exposed prior to grouting and truncation.

11

From the work methodology, the nature, number and sizes of mechanical equipment, and number and skills of personnel to be deployed on the working level, has been determined.

12

The use of plant and equipment has been identified, managed and controlled within the Project Risk Register, Plant and Equipment Register, Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment, demolition plan and the contractor’s safe systems of work.

13

Advice from a structural engineer has been received regarding the ability of the structure to safely sustain the proposed loads.

14

The work methodology details restrictions on working hours, use of public thoroughfares, noise levels, etc.

15

The work methodology includes a time-line showing the commencement of work, milestones and the completion of work.

16

Approval has been given to use the work plan methodology by the client/owner and other stakeholders.

17

All site personnel have been inducted and trained in the work methodology safety procedures, and established procedures for dealing with emergencies via the Record of Toolbox Talk – Evacuation Drill / Testing of Emergency Response (e.g. accidents, fires, rescue plans).

18

State Regulator requirements have been checked to ensure that the demolition contractor’s licence is verified as appropriate for the class of demolition activity.

19

All necessary plant, equipment and tools are available and in good working order.

20

A copy of AS/NZ 2601 Demolition of Structures is available.

21

Any alterations to bracing, propping, structural members or demolition method have been reviewed and approved by the structural engineer in writing, prior to the alterations commencing.

22

A registered surveyor has been engaged to set out the penetration/s taking into account minimum distances are maintained from remaining structural elements such as beams and slab step downs.

23

Where the slab contains structural tendons a plan of truncation has been developed and reviewed by the structural engineer for approval.

24

Existing services have been relocated a safe distance from the penetration to allow for the installation of falsework (temporary support structures). If falsework is over 4 meters in height then the erector must hold a scaffold ticket.

25

A structural engineer has reviewed the installed form/falsework and has issued a certificate for use prior to removal works commencing.

26

Environmental controls have been implemented to control concrete slurry and dust from the cutting process.

27

Truncation has been completed and epoxy grout has cured prior to the cutting of the slab.

28

Concrete is cut into easy-to-handle sized blocks using a gantry hoist or similar – the use of mechanical aids for handling of material from the work location to the disposal location must be addressed in the contractor’s SWMS or Safe System of Work.

Use an online concrete weight calculator to determine approximate weights – as an example a 300mm x 300mm x 100mm concrete block will weight approximately 21kg.

29

The corners of the penetration are squared and cleaned up prior to the removal of falsework.

The use of a ring saw will prevent the need for overcutting and provide a clean penetration edge.



Perfect Delivery is a cornerstone of the SHAPE brand and reputation. Delivering a project perfectly is not only about the end result, it is about the project journey and the client experience.


1

The bid/production team handover includes discussion regarding client expectations.

2

The project team has considered a Perfect Delivery (PD) strategy in preparation for the project start up meeting. The project team has established key steps to achieve defect free, on time completion, development of Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Manuals, delivery of client training, etc.

3

Clients, Architects, PM’s and Consultants are advised that they will receive a Client Experience Survey at the end of the project which will enquire as to whether the project was delivered at the agreed time, defect free, and with O&M Manuals and relevant training provided.

4

  • A detailed dilapidation report is completed in Procore prior to works commencing, including all existing building finishes and services across the site area and also areas of access and egress (e.g. lifts, loading docks, shared and public areas). This report has been provided to key stakeholders e.g. building manager, client representative/superintendent.

5

The project documentation has been reviewed, to determine requirements for samples, shop drawings and prototypes, which is then communicated to relevant contractors.

6

A procurement schedule has been developed, and long lead items are tracked via the project programme and subcontractor meeting forums.

7

Training of end users and stakeholders has been documented in the project programme.

8

Quality standards have been agreed with contractors through tender interviews, site inductions and subcontractor meetings.

9

There is a strategy in place to commence the collection of O&M Manual data as early as possible in the project, i.e. once trade contracts are let.

10

Perfect Delivery to be discussed at the Subbie Meetings.

11

Document transmittals are updated and distributed via Procore and the weekly subcontractor meeting, to ensure the most current document revisions are being used.

12

Quality management inspections are completed after each subcontractor and PCG meeting, to ensure issues are identified and rectified promptly.

13

Strategies are in place for subcontractors to develop their own defect lists, e.g. contract requirement for submission of verification plan with progress claim.

14

Witness or hold points are documented and monitored in the project programme and are discussed during subcontractor meetings.

15

Training of end users and stakeholders has been arranged.

16

Aftercare arrangements are in place and have been communicated to the client representative, i.e. a SHAPE team member has been nominated as the key contact.



At SHAPE, the health and safety of our people and business partners is paramount. We are committed to preventing or reducing the severity of injuries through implementation of these Minimum Standards for PPE.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works to identify site and task specific PPE requirements for inclusion the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Project specific PPE requirements including Client and Base Builder requirements are included in the Site Specific Induction Handout and site signage.

3

Task specific PPE is considered by subcontractors and their workers and used in accordance with product safety data sheets, SWMS/SSOW and the requirements of the SHAPE EHSQ Management System.

4

Subcontractor SWMS/SSOW are reviewed via the applicable SWMS Review or SSOW Review to ensure PPE requirements are adequately addressed.

5

Contractors review PPE requirements further through the daily Pre-Start Meeting process, to ensure PPE controls remain appropriate.

6

The current PPE Policy has been posted on the site noticeboard to inform all stakeholders of key requirements.

7

Safety helmets are being worn correctly at all times while on site as per the manufacturer’s instructions – where there is a risk of helmets falling off chin straps will be used.

8

Respirators and dust masks are used in accordance with the equipment manufacturer’s instructions, and comply to any relevant requirements of the product Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and the contractor’s SWMS/SSOW.

9

Height safety PPE such as harnesses / lanyards are fit for purpose and within test date, with copies of records on file and their use is addressed within the subcontractor’s SWMS.

10

PPE has not been modified and complies with the relevant Australian Standards.

11

PPE is maintained in a serviceable condition.

12

PPE requirements are reassessed when the scope of work has changed or modified, and the Project Risk Register as well as the SWMS/SSOW is updated to reflect this.

13

Project team members are not permitted to reduce the conditions of this Minimum Standard or the SHAPE PPE policy for the sake of convenience.

14

To demonstrate safety leadership, SHAPE production staff are required to wear safety glasses while stationed on or visiting any SHAPE site.
Exceptions: When in site amenities areas or dedicated PPE Free Zones.

15

Safety Glasses are worn by all subcontractors and their workers at all times while on site.

Exceptions: When in site amenities areas or dedicated PPE Free Zones.

16

Safety glasses are the minimum requirement, however additional task specific eye protection may be required for some activities. e.g. goggles, gasket-rimmed glasses or face shields.

17

Project team members are authorised to increase eye protection control measures in consideration of the work activity and level of risk, however project team members are not permitted to reduce the conditions of this Minimum Standard.

18

All visitors must wear safety glasses while on site.

Exceptions: When in site amenities areas or PPE Free Zones.

19

Visitors will be advised of any additional eye protection requirements via the site specific induction; this may include “no go” zones where standard safety glasses are not deemed suitable protection.

20

To demonstrate safety leadership, SHAPE production staff are required to wear gloves while stationed on or visiting a SHAPE site.

Exceptions: When in site amenities areas or dedicated PPE Free Zones.

21

Gloves are worn by all subcontractors including supervisors, project managers and their workers at all times while on site.

Exceptions: When in site amenities areas or dedicated PPE Free Zones.

22

Where gloves may increase the risk of injury as determined by the equipment manufacturer’s recommendations, or through a documented risk assessment approved by a SHAPE Operations Manager/General Manager or EHSQ Team Member, they may be removed or substituted for a more appropriate protective equipment, e.g. cut resistant gloves substituted to leather gloves for hot works to mitigate the risk of burns.

23

Client Visitors are not required to wear hand protection unless requested to do so by the Project Team, with consideration of site specific hazards. Site specific requirements are communicated during the visitor induction process.

24

Visitors are advised not to handle any equipment or materials via the visitor site induction and must be accompanied by a fully inducted escort.

25

Gloves must always be worn in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions – gloves may not be altered in any way and the cuffs must be fully extended over the wrist, i.e. not rolled up to the base of the hand.

26

This table lists specific activities where SHAPE has adopted Minimum Standards for Mandatory Protective Clothing. Further risk assessment will be required for tasks and site specific hazards not addressed in the list below to ensure appropriate protective clothing is being worn at all times.

27

Due to the nature of work that SHAPE performs and our typical work environments, SHAPE does not permit low cut safety footwear.

However, it is recognised that low cut safety footwear may be more appropriate for specialised activities such as roofing or rope access – a documented risk assessment approved by the Operations Manager/General Manager or an EHSQ Team Member will be required in these circumstances.

28

The requirements and types of protective and occupational footwear need to be considered based on the task being undertaken, and must be worn to prevent or reduce injuries to feet resulting from:

  • Contact with falling, rolling or cutting objects;
  • Penetration through the sole or uppers;
  • Friction or pressure blistering;
  • Explosions and electrical hazards;
  • Contact with chemicals, heat and molten metals; and
  • Slipping

29

Project team members may restrict workers performing certain tasks based on the type of footwear being worn and the hazards present on site. These hazards and constraints will be communicated though the Site Specific Induction Handout.

30

Steel or composite capped safety footwear must be worn by all subcontractors and workers (including SHAPE production staff), which are designed to give protection against a drop force of at least 200J and against a rolling compression load of at least 15kN.

31

Visitor footwear must consist of flat soled, enclosed shoes or boots (which must have adequate penetration protection). Project team members may restrict access to visitors based on the type of footwear being worn and the hazards present on the site. These hazards and constraints will be communicated though the Site Specific Induction Handout.



The SHAPE Plant and Equipment Guide provides further information on the types of plant and equipment used on our sites, and the appropriate inspection schedules for each. Also refer to SHAPE’s Plant and Equipment Controls Procedure for further information.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to plant and equipment for inclusion into the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

For all plant and equipment, a Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment has been completed. Where required, the following documentation is reviewed and copies are maintained on site:

  1. Daily inspection logbooks
  2. Service records
  3. Operations manual
  4. Verification of competency
  5. Plant and Equipment Registration (in line with state and Territory regulatory authorities)
  6. Registration with Road Authorities where the plant itself is to be driven on public roads

3

The SHAPE Plant and Equipment Register is competed for all plant.

4

Contractor Safe Work Method Statements (SWMS) are prepared by subcontractors for construction work associated with plant and equipment, and reviewed using the SWMS Review.

5

Relevant information, training, and instructions have been provided to workers who are involved in the activity. For example: Site Specific Induction, Toolbox Talks, training in SWMS, Pre-Starts, etc.

6

The Plant or Equipment operator is competent, or licenced to use the plant or equipment when required (refer to the Verification of Competency SMS).

7

The Plant and Equipment is suitable for the task being performed.

8

The plant is positioned so that the risk of injury from collision with other plant or structures is eliminated where possible.

9

Exclusion zones and warning signage are in place to control plant, equipment and worker interaction.

10

Permanently located and legible (decals) operating instructions are displayed at operating positions, i.e. ground controls, or cabin and basket controls.

11

When required, certification has been provided by a competent person that the surface has adequate bearing capacity to support the plant and equipment (e.g. structural engineer, geotech engineer, scanning techniques).

12

The surface incline is not exceeded with respect to the manufacturer’s operating instructions for that type of plant or equipment.

13

Puncture proof tyres are used where the loss of inflation could cause instability.

14

All controls are in good condition and return to the neutral position automatically upon release.

15

Where spotters are required as part of the management and controls of plant, copies of the evidence of competency or training are maintained on site.

16

Plant and equipment movements may only take place with the basket in the lowest position. Where movements are permitted by the manufacturer in the extended position, this may only take place in a designated exclusion zone to eliminate the risk of collision with other plant, people and objects.

17

The locations of all emergency stops are clearly visible, known by operators and spotters, and are accessible at all times during operation.

18

Overhead and underground services are identified and controlled, e.g. overhead power lines, electrical cables, gas, water, fire services, etc.

19

Firefighting equipment is available within plant and equipment baskets/cabins where hot works are being performed.

20

On delivery and unloading from a truck, there are measures in place to prevent injuries or accidents relating to pedestrians and other road users,
i.e. traffic control, spotters, warning signage.

21

When plant or equipment is being used in the vicinity of a live edge (e.g. stair penetrations, kerb and channel, external building perimeters, change of levels), controls are in place to keep the plant or equipment a safe distance from the edge, i.e. wheel stops, tethering, certified barriers.

22

Battery powered mobile plant is recharged in a designated area and away from temporary construction switchboards.

23

Combustion type engines (e.g. diesel powered EWPs, petrol powered concrete cutting saws, LPG forklifts) are only operated outdoors, or with adequate mechanical ventilation if operated within an internal environment.

24

Refuelling of combustion motorised plant is completed in a designated area, and is addressed within the contractor’s SWMS.



In Precast Construction the concrete panels are formed off-site by casting the concrete in reusable moulds or slabs, then curing the panels in a controlled manufacturing environment. The panels must then be transported to the installation site. In Tilt-Up Construction, the panels are poured on the building site and then lifted into place. This Minimum Standard provides guidance to persons working on SHAPE projects regarding the safe management of onsite and offsite precast concrete elements in building and civil construction.


1

During preconstruction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to the precast or tilt-up activities for inclusion into the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan. Chain of Custody hazards and controls must be considered for precast panels being transported and delivered to site to ensure public and worker safety.

2

Prior to commencing any activities, the requirements of the Precast & Tilt-Up Construction Checklist are reviewed with regard to project specific scope and responsibilities.

3

The Project Verification Plan is completed in order to identify quality risk factors and suitable inspection, test and hold points.

Typical verification items include:

  • Concrete strength and testing requirements
  • Concrete finish / type / colour
  • Engineer inspection regime for reinforcing, erection, propping, propping removal, etc.
  • In-situ services locations
  • Window and door opening locations
  • Finish features, edge and joint details, etc.

4

In Western Australia only, the Worksafe WA Commissioner must be advised at least 10 working days before the casting process begins for a particular job or order. This notification must be in an approved form, and a copy must be kept on site. The design, transport, erection, bracing and fixing must be carried out in accordance with AS 3850. The work must be directly supervised by a person who has completed an approved tilt-up course. All relevant documentation must be kept at the worksite.

5

There is a certified design for precast and tilt-up concrete elements.

6

The crane/s identified for each lift are suitable for the activity – refer to the Lifting Operations SMS.

7

The crane lifting plan is aligned to the precast lifting and erection plan sequencing.

8

A Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment has been completed prior to lifting activities – refer to the Plant & Equipment SMS.

9

SWMS are in place for work involving concrete elements including:

  • Propping / Bracing Plan (must be designed and signed off by a structural engineer including fixings, dead man footings, etc.)
  • Stripping Plan (must be designed and signed off by a structural engineer)
  • Lifting gear and backup slings
  • Components & certifications
  • Cranage – positioning, load distribution, point loading, capacity and radius restrictions
  • Pre-cast (formwork, pouring concrete, hazardous substances, and petrol-powered tools)

10

A documented emergency response plan is in place for all high-risk activities and;

A trial emergency response has been completed and documented via the SHAPE Record of Toolbox Talk – Evacuation Drill / Testing of Emergency Response.

11

There is an approved and documented safe erection system / plan in place.

12

The general requirements for storage of concrete elements are that:

  • the concrete elements should only be stored in a position approved by an engineer, this will usually be the erection design engineer
  • racking systems, frames and supports should be designed by the engineer for the shape, size and weight of the concrete element
  • approval and written instructions should be obtained from the engineer before a concrete element is stored horizontally

*refer to the National Code of Practice for Precast, Tilt-Up and Concrete Elements In Building Construction for more information.

Engineer review and approval is required to verify the areas used as the casting bed (for tilt-up panels) and for crane set up (for both precast and tilt-up construction).

13

A bracing/propping install and removal methodology has been approved by a structural engineer and is available on site.

14

Any changes to bracing / propping support system design are approved by the designer in writing prior to the changes being affected.

15

Concrete panel bracing, preferred arrangement

Bracing must be installed perpendicular to the concrete panel in the plan (see below). Skewed braces greater than +/- 5 degrees to perpendicular will reduce concrete panel stability. The design and installation of skewed braces will need to be carefully reviewed to consider any induced lateral and torsional forces to the panel.

16

Corner Bracing:

The plan below shows the correct method for bracing corner elements without having to skew the braces for attachment to the floor slab. Attachment of braces to concrete blocks (deadmen) in the leave-out area between the floor slab and the concrete elements allows the braces to be properly located without skew. Concrete element stability is reduced when braces are skewed.

 

17

Levelling Shims:

Shims carry the load of the concrete element to prevent movement until the concrete element is incorporated in the main structure.

A levelling pad (concrete footing) or a level bearing area is used to provide a level seating for the shims. Unless designed and specified otherwise, shimming should be a maximum height of 40mm, a minimum length of 150mm and a minimum width of 100mm.

Levelling pads and shims should comply with the relevant requirements of AS 3850 or the most recent equivalent.

*refer to the National Code of Practice for Precast, Tilt-Up and Concrete Elements In Building Construction for more information.

18

Lifting Inserts:

Proprietary cast-in lifting inserts are to be specified by the precast / tilt panel engineer, also known as the erection design engineer. The inserts must have test certificates available, issued by a NATA or an equivalent testing authority.

Lifting inserts must comply with the requirements of AS 3850.

*refer to the National Code of Practice for Precast, Tilt-Up and Concrete Elements In Building Construction for more information.

19

Concrete strength test results for all structural elements including footings, floor slabs and panels are verified as meeting design criteria prior to installation.

20

Subcontractor personnel are trained and competent in the erection of the precast elements – i.e. personnel are able to provide evidence of the completion of training in one of the following:

Contribute to safe tilt-up construction;
or CPCCCM1007A Carry out tilt-up work safely;
or CPCCCM2011A Carry out tilt up work safely;
or CPCCCM1016 Identify requirements for safe tilt-up work.

21

Lifting Clutch testing and inspection has been completed by a competent person (lifting equipment engineer) and complies with the mandatory annual Standard requirements – AS3850.

22

Lifting clutches have been approved by the precast panel / tilt up panel engineer, concrete element manufacturer / designer and match the cast-in lifting points.

23

A Lifting Operations Permit has been completed and issued to the erection subcontractor prior to each day’s lifting.

24

Physical exclusion zones and warning signage are in place during erection and lifting activities.

25

Lifting operations are conducted as per the Lifting Operations Permit, and as per the schedule of common lifts which is determined after a detailed lift study is conducted.

In some situations, mobile cranes are used in the pick-and-carry mode to lift concrete panels. In this situation, crawler type lattice boom mobile cranes with steel tracks should be selected.

The use of rubber-tyred mobile cranes are not to be used for the following reasons:

  • the lifting capacity is generally too low for most panel jobs;
  • these cranes are more prone to overturning than crawler cranes due to:
    • being articulated
    • being supported by rubber tyres that compress
    • having wheels that are more prone to enter ground depressions than tracks are, and
    • having hydraulic booms that are heavier than lattice booms.

26

Preferred concrete panel rigging configurations:

Note: dimensions on slings are total length through sheaves. The lifting insert supplier may specify a maximum value for this angle.

27

Dead man screw anchors / rock anchors are regularly inspected for damage, uplift or lateral movement.

28

An inspection programme, managed by the Site Manager / Foreman, is in place to monitor panel support systems and temporary barriers.

Visual inspections shall take place on a regular basis (at least daily), using a checklist, and be reconducted after events such as high winds or impact that may cause instability in the support system – in these instances additional exclusion zones may be required.

29

Tilt-up is an engineering system, and design must be completed by an engineer specialising in tilt up construction. Design cannot be changed in the field without the approval of the engineer.

30

All variations from the design, relating both to the panel and support system must be checked by the engineer and either be:

  • Certified by the engineer as being acceptable (i.e. complying with AS 3850) in writing, if the engineer can verify this is the case, or;
  • Altered in accordance with the engineer’s written directions so as to comply with AS 3850, within a time frame specified by the engineer.

31

Prior to removing temporary bracing from the panels, a competent person (e.g. engineer) is to inspect the building to ensure that all permanent structural members and brackets have been attached to the panels in accordance with the engineer’s instructions. A sign off procedure should be implemented to verify that this has been completed.

32

Removal of temporary bracing is managed in accordance with the propping and bracing plan / methodology which has been written and approved by the engineer (usually the structural design engineer).

33

Checklists have been developed and are being used whenever installing precast or tilt-up concrete panels covering:

  • Design, erection and safety documentation;
  • Competencies of workers undertaking the work;
  • Training in safety documentation and communication for each day’s work;
  • Pre-erection;
  • Lifting and positioning;
  • Temporary bracing and supports;
  • Permanent supports;
  • Grouting; and
  • Other site-specific items.



At SHAPE we pride ourselves on our clients experiencing better. This can only be achieved through detailed Quality Management planning, implementation and monitoring.


1

During pre-construction, the project documentation is reviewed to identify and document Quality Management requirements within the Project Delivery Plan and project Risk Register.

2

A construction program is developed to include key quality deliverables, inspections, hold points and lead time items which form part of the critical path.

3

A project start-up meeting has been conducted with the client, where SHAPE’s internal measure of Perfect Delivery is communicated (i.e. defect free, finishing on time, providing the Operations and Maintenance manuals and training within one week of project completion).

4

Based on the project specifications, the project team engage with the key client stakeholders, suppliers and contractors to establish requirements for samples, prototypes, data sheets and provision of shop drawings, etc.

5

A detailed dilapidation report is completed, and filed within Procore and issued to the client and key stakeholders via the Procore submittal process. A dilapidation report should not just record the state of damage or imperfections, but the state of any particular aspect of the property that may be affected by construction work, including but not limited to:

  • General conditions photos
  • Access and egress pathways
  • Lifts, lift fronts, lobbies
  • Loading docks
  • Windows and mullions
  • Operation and effectiveness of existing services (e.g. temperature and flow rates)

6

Services investigations are undertaken to ensure adequate capacity for design intent, e.g. electrical switchboards, incoming power supplies, condensed water, fresh air supplies.

7

Project documentation is distributed to subcontractors and suppliers via the Procore transmittal process.

8

Contractors are advised of quality management deliverables via the Procore submittal process.

9

A defect-free strategy is developed and agreed upon, and communicated to subcontractors, client and the project team.

10

The following quality management processes are implemented to ensure the final product is delivered as specified:

  • Sample Registers
  • Subcontractor Checklists
  • Verification Plans
  • Product and Safety Data Sheets (PDSs and SDSs)
  • Shop Drawings
  • Third Party Certifications
  • Material / Equipment Certificates
  • Material / Equipment Warranties
  • As Surveyed details
  • Inspection Test Plans (ITPs, when appropriate)
  • Defect Inspections via Procore
  • Works to Complete List via Procore

11

Checklists, Verification Plans and ITPs developed by the subcontractor (based on the project documentation) are reviewed by the SHAPE Project Team, and provided to the design consultants, engineers and/or architects as required for comment.

12

The weekly Client Coordination meeting includes an item to review and discuss project samples, Request for Information (RFI) responses, variations, project documentation and general quality management items.

13

The weekly Subcontractor Coordination meeting includes an item to review and discuss project samples, Request for Information (RFI) responses, variations, project documentation and general quality management items.

14

A process is in place to ensure project documentation is marked as “superseded” and filed following revisions. This includes subcontractor copies of documentation.

15

Project resourcing is appropriate and project team responsibilities have been assigned and accepted.

16

Training for end users has been planned and coordinated with relevant subcontractors, and records of training are maintained within the project files.

17

The construction program is being managed, in use, current, statused and distributed to the client, key stakeholders and subcontractors on a regular basis.

18

Quality management non-conformances are recorded, managed and corrected via the Procore Observations tool.

19

A subcontractor and consultant inspection regime is in place, to ensure timely observation and correction of quality-related matters, i.e. ideally after each client meeting or subcontractor meeting.



Site Specific Safe Work Method Statements (SWMS) are required under legislation for all High Risk Construction Work. For work that is not defined as ‘High Risk Construction Work’ by law or a SHAPE documented risk assessment, an alternative Safe System of Work (SSOW) may be appropriate, at the discretion of the SHAPE Site Manager.


1

Projects teams have compiled a project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan based on the contracted scope.

2

The Project Delivery Plan, project Risk Register and Building Hazardous Material Register (Asbestos Register) have been distributed through Procore to all Contractors engaged to perform work on the project for their information and development of task specific SWMS.

3

Contractors’ SWMS or SSOW are requested through the Procore Submittal tool for review at least 3 business days prior to the agreed start date.

4

Contractors’ SWMS are reviewed using the SWMS Review.

  • All non-project specific details are removed from SWMS
    • References to other site/project locations are removed or struck out
    • All references to other Principle Contractors are removed or struck out
    • References to Plant and Equipment not applicable to the project scope are removed or struck out
    • References to activities outside of contracted scope are removed or struck out
    • References to substances or materials not applicable to the site/project are removed or struck out
  • Project specific details are included:
    • SHAPE is identified as the Principle Contractor
    • Site address and location of the work is correct
    • Revision date is current
    • Task specific job steps, hazards and controls are listed (including the required permits)
    • The person responsible for the implementation and monitoring of the SWMS is identified in the SWMS
    • Building Management requirements are included, e.g. access, loading, impairment of services
    • Timing of activities such as noisy or disruptive work
    • Relevant hazards and controls from the SHAPE Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan have been considered and included where applicable
    • Hazards and controls around hazardous materials, i.e. ACM in the building
    • Hazardous Chemicals applicable for the scope are listed, and controls about their safe use
    • Hazards and controls to plant and equipment applicable to the works

5

Contractors’ SSOW are reviewed using the SSOW Review.

6

There is evidence of consultation, communication and training for the SWMS / SSOW content by way of a sign off sheet appended to the back of the SWMS / SSOW.

7

Evidence of competency is provided for high risk and/or specialised trade activities (refer to the Verification of Competency SHAPE Minimum Standard for further information).

8

Electric Tool Registers and Plant and Equipment Registers may be provided as part of the SWMS / SSOW or as a separate document.

9

Emergency response has been addressed for High Risk Activities either within the SWMS or a separate response plan.

10

Documents referenced within the SWMS / SSOW that form part of the SWMS / SSOW controls are available for review, and evidence of training is available.

11

SWMS / SSOW are required on site for all trade packages including client novated base building and downstream subcontractors accessing SHAPE project sites, and are assessed using the relevant SHAPE SWMS Review or SSOW Review.

12

Young or inexperienced workers are provided appropriate supervision and training in safe work practices by their employer.

13

SHAPE engaged labour hire contractors have the required competencies and have been consulted and trained in a documented SWMS.

14

SWMS / SSOW are updated when new or increased hazards are identified.

15

SWMS / SSOW have been developed for SHAPE Construction Workers and they have been consulted and provided training on the content.

16

Task Inspections on work activities addressed in a SWMS are conducted in accordance with the SHAPE EHSQ Frequency Chart.



Site Establishment and Presentation is a reflection of SHAPE and your own personal brand.


1

Prior to establishing site, key pre-construction activities have been completed which includes:

  • Project Risk Register
  • Project Delivery Plan
  • Site Specific Induction Handout
  • Hazardous Chemicals Register
  • SWMS Review
  • SSOW Review
  • Electrical Protection Plan (“Part A”)
  • Dilapidation report
  • Evacuation Diagrams have been developed and posted using the SHAPE Evacuation Diagram Tool

2

The project waste management strategy represents the most effective way to ensure site cleanliness and SHAPE housekeeping expectations.

Clean sites result in improved:

  • Workplace productivity
  • Worker behaviours
  • Health and safety outcomes
  • Quality outcomes = zero defects

3

Buildings constructed prior to Dec 31 2003 present a higher risk of asbestos containing materials being present – the building asbestos / hazardous materials register has been reviewed for the presence of ACMs and where required further inspections and sampling have been arranged via a hygienist.

4

Where the asbestos / hazardous materials register or hygienist report identifies asbestos or other hazardous materials, the hazards and controls are included in the Project Delivery Plan and Risk Register, and are communicated to workers and relevant visitors via the Site Specific Induction.

Refer to the Asbestos Management Procedure and Part F of the Site Specific Induction.

5

A project dilapidation report has been completed prior to commencing work on site.

6

Site lighting requirements are planned with respect to the new floor layout, safe access and egress. The quality of finishes may also be negatively impacted by inadequate lighting of work areas.

Site Signage
7

Signage is a reflection of SHAPE’s and your personal brand – it is always clean, free from damage, the current revision of the SHAPE standard signage template, and posted at approximately 1.5m to the centre line of the sign using appropriate mechanical fixings and/or concealed adhesive tapes, etc.

Note: only clear adhesive tape may be used when required – duct or packing tapes, etc. are not permitted.

8

Site entry signage is posted at all entries to site.

9

A site sign in / out station and register is in place at the point of entry.

10

To eliminate the need for workers to cross the site area without wearing PPE, worker PPE storage is available at the site entry, e.g. pigeon holes, shelving or coat hook arrangements.

11

A white board or electronic monitor is in place for general and daily pre-start communications.

12

Way finding and directional signage is posted in prominent locations to ensure clarity. Directions to Amenities, Office and Meeting Rooms are clear and up to date.

13

Internal site noticeboards are posted – generally in lunch rooms or where the site inductions take place.

14

Site specific signage is printed in colour, laminated and relevant to project specific details.

15

Task specific warning signage (e.g. “overhead works”) is posted in the vicinity of the hazard location.

16

Possibilities for external signage (e.g. hoardings and branding) have been investigated and confirmed if viable. Confirm Client and Building Manager requirements and consult with your General Manager or Commercial Manager.

17

A contact list with photos of the project team is located within site boundaries.

Access and Egress
18

Site access is suitably secured to prevent unauthorised access, theft or disturbance.

19

Designated material storage areas have been identified, and material is safely and neatly stored.

20

All walkways and access corridors are adequately lit and free of materials.

Protection of Existing Finishes
21

Protection is installed to all existing finishes to a high standard and maintained

22

Subcontractors are protecting their own work and they have an adequate supply of protection available on site, for installation to their completed finishes

  • Signage is located on new and old finishes stating that care is to be taken
  • Protection is monitored and rectified as required to maintain its effectiveness

23

A dilapidation report has been compiled on existing finishes and services, including photos and test results (for services).

24

Copies of the reports have been distributed to relevant stakeholders, e.g. building manager, client, consultant, etc.

Offices and Meeting Rooms
25

Existing or proposed office spaces / rooms are being utilised during the construction period where possible.

26

Site Office and Meeting Rooms have clear signage, and have either:

  • Walls made from pre-finished, or painted board; and
  • Polythene walls or barricades (on shorter term projects).

27

Walls / barricades are clean and in good condition.

28

Offices and Meeting Rooms have carpet and ceiling (where possible and appropriate).

29

All tables and chairs are clean and suitable for purpose.

30

The site office is not used as a storeroom.

31

A sample board or finishes schedule with labels and references is clearly displayed and signed off.

 

32

Architect’s graphics are on display (if available).

33

A variety of drink options are provided for meetings (e.g. coffee and tea making facilities are available, water, juice or soft drink are able to be offered during meetings).

34

Appliances are properly maintained, tested and tagged.

35

The Site Office includes the following items:

  • A First Aid Kit with appropriate signage
  • Site documentation & folders, which are organised and well-presented
  • Site printer and copier (when required)
  • Plan desk and plan hangers
  • Waste bin (which is regularly emptied)
  • Lockable storage

36

Working spaces for SHAPE Project team members, Corporate Services, visitors, consultants or other SHAPE employees has been considered and provided.

37

The current revision of the EHSQ Frequency Chart is displayed within the Site Office.

38

Where a full set up is not possible due to the size of the project, the Operations Manager or General Manager have been consulted.

39

A short range programme is clearly displayed and up to date.

40

The current construction programme is displayed on the wall.

Messing and Ablution Facilities
41

The Lunch Room / Change Rooms are separated from the work zone, cleaned regularly, have clear signage and have either:

  • Walls made from pre-finished, or painted board
  • Polythene walls or barricades (on shorter term projects)

42

A ceiling is in place.

43

Floor covering is able to be mopped.

44

The following appliances have been provided, and are properly maintained, tested and tagged:

  • Water cooler
  • Boiling water units or kettles
  • Microwave oven
  • Fridge
  • Sink and mains water supply, if practicable

45

The lunch room table and chairs are clean and in good condition (amenities chairs must be industrial rated and not domestic plastic chairs).

46

The lunch area has adequate lighting and waste bins, and is kept clean from construction dust and fumes.

47

Toilet facilities are adequate for the number of workers and gender composition of the workforce and visitors.

If the exact make-up of the workforce and visitors are unknown, toilet facilities need to accommodate both males and females.

Sanitary disposal units are included in female closets.

48

Site Toilets contain adequate:

  • Toilet paper
  • Hand washing facilities
  • Soap
  • Rubbish bins
  • Sanitary disposal

49

Toilets have a regular cleaning regime in place which is monitored.

Note: workers and visitors (client representatives) often associate the cleanliness of bathrooms and other site amenities with the management style of your project team – always ensure an appropriate cleaning regime is in place.

50

Where a full set up is not possible due to the size of the project, the Operations Manager or General Manager have been consulted to ensure that SHAPE’s workplace consultation requirements are met.

Subcontractor Activities
51

Cutting areas, specialist trade activity areas and storage areas are planned for and established on site to benefit site presentation, health, safety and quality outcomes.

52

Designated areas for the following have been identified, which are adequately signposted and protected:

  • MDF Cutting Room
  • Plaster mixing
  • Pipe threading
  • Paint storage and clean out
  • Metal cut off / Drop saw
  • Other wet trade mixing / wash down areas, as required

53

There is evidence that subcontractors are cleaning up after themselves daily.

Inspection and Monitoring
54

Works to Complete Lists are completed via Procore, which includes a subcontractor and consultant inspection regime being in place, to ensure timely observation and correction of quality-related matters, i.e. ideally after each client meeting or subcontractor meeting.

55

Procore QR codes are utilised and displayed to encourage ongoing defect management.

56

Best practices are being used on site and are being recognised.

57

New ideas are being implemented and being shared with the whole of SHAPE.



When construction work is carried out on a site that is near or adjacent to the property boundary or to any public place, the risks of site separation and public interface must be eliminated, isolated, or reduced.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to the risk of unauthorised site access and public safety around the external perimeter of the site, for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

There are Safe Systems of Work / SWMS in place and approved for all site separation activities, i.e. fencing, hoarding, etc. prior to the works commencing.

3

Permits and approvals (council and building management) are in place prior to erecting fencing, barricades or hoardings.

4

Overhead works in proximity of public areas are assessed and controls are implemented where required.

Site Fencing and Hoarding:
5

  • Are of a suitable height and type to prevent climbing
  • Prevent unauthorised access below the panels
  • Are suitably wind and impact rated with installation and engineering certificates/ records of inspection available on site
  • Where shade cloth or banners are attached to fencing or hoardings, appropriate wind loading controls have been implemented. Additional bracing and certification may be required
  • Temporary fencing hand rails should be installed where there is a risk of pedestrians tripping over the fence feet, e.g. on or near a public walkway

  • Vehicle entry gates are lockable and securely braced to prevent damage from wind loads and/or vehicle impact
  • Pedestrian access is available – lockable and separate from vehicle access
  • Site Entry/Construction Warning signage is posted at site entry points and at required intervals
  • Temporary fencing must not be modified by anyone other than the contracted and competent installer
  • Consideration has been given for access to fire services equipment (e.g. hydrants) in the placement of fencing or hoarding
  • Egress or evacuation routes are not impeded by fencing or hoarding
  • Public-facing hoarding and fencing are clean, well presented, freshly painted and combine the use of signage and graphics to reflect the SHAPE brand

Public Walkways:
6

  • The risk of falling objects has been managed and controlled through the use of overhead gantries, crash decks, mesh screening, etc.
  • External or public walkways are free of trip hazards, have adequate lighting and have directional signage in place
  • Pedestrian / traffic controllers are used to manage vehicle and equipment movements
  • Where pedestrian ramps or ramping is required, consideration to Australian Standard 1428 (Design for Access and Mobility) must be considered, i.e. level of incline, distance travelled between landings, tactile indicators

External Impact to Site:
7

  • Temporary switchboards situated in external work areas are locked at the end of each shift
  • Water vessels are covered or emptied
  • Materials and waste are secured / tied down for wind hazards
  • Loading and unloading of plant and equipment is completed in accordance with the traffic management plan, road transport rules / legislation and permits
  • Site excavations are suitably barricaded and sign posted
  • Work activities which are external to the site envelope have adequate exclusion zones and warning signage
  • Reinforcing bars / star pickets / impalement risks are suitably capped
  • Building / construction elements are adequately braced to prevent collapse until structurally connected or braced
  • Adequate night lighting is in place for emergency access
  • Site security provisions have been considered and are in place, e.g. static guards, security cameras, monitoring systems, etc.

Internal Sites:
8

  • Lift controls are programmed to prevent unauthorised access to SHAPE work areas or floors
  • A physical barrier or catchment zone has been established where lift access cannot be secured
  • On occupied floors the SHAPE site entry point signage restricts access
  • The site is able to be secured at the end of each shift
  • For high security sites, an electronic security system is in place, e.g. swipe card access, digital or push button security hardware, security turnstiles, etc.
  • When internal stairwells/fire stairs are used for access between floors, controls are in place to prevent unauthorised access
  • PPE Free Zones are clearly defined and provide safe access between the site entry and site office



This SMS provides practical guidance on the safe handling and storage of materials.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to the safe handling and storage of materials, for inclusion into the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

Consideration should be given to:

  • Provision of storage facilities OFF SITE
  • Scheduling of deliveries to prevent bulk loading
  • Safe loading and unloading zones
  • Traffic management
  • Access to the building – e.g. use of existing lifts, stairs or provision of a materials hoist, etc.
  • The types and sizes of material to be delivered or removed
  • Public interface
  • Manual handling controls
  • Set down areas
  • Designated subcontractor storage zones
  • Isolation of materials – barricades and signage
  • Security of materials
  • Moveability of stored materials – e.g. materials are stored on pallets or mobile “A” frame racks

2

The Site Specific Induction Handout details project specific requirements for delivery, handling and storage of materials.

Consideration is given to loading and unloading activities that take place outside of the site envelope – as principal contractor SHAPE have obligations to ensure the safety of workers carrying out these activities, be it in the building loading dock or on a public road or place.

Management diagrams may be required to show designated loading/unloading zones and storage areas.

3

Subcontractor SWMS are reviewed using the SHAPE SWMS/SSOW Review to ensure delivery, handling and storage of materials hazards and controls are adequately addressed and specific to the project.

Key considerations:

  • Unloading from vehicles
  • Unloading in public locations – interface with vehicle and pedestrian traffic
  • Manual handling techniques
  • Use of mechanical aids
  • Use of spotters
  • Timing for deliveries
  • Storage of materials
  • PPE
  • Workers are trained in manual handling.

4

Materials are not stored in access ways or areas of work.

If work is to be performed near to or in the vicinity of materials, a risk assessment has been undertaken to determine the hazards – any risk level above LOW risk will require the materials to be relocated to another suitable location.

5

Materials are not stored in access ways or areas of work.

If work is to be performed near to or in the vicinity of materials, a risk assessment has been undertaken to determine the hazards – any risk level above LOW risk will require the materials to be relocated to another suitable location.

6

All materials are stored on pallets or mobile storage racks – NOT directly on the floor.

7

Where there is a risk of materials falling, those materials are restrained with suitable load rated strapping.

8

Materials are NEVER leant against walls or partitions.

9

Glazing panel edges (new and demolition) are protected to prevent connection with body parts while being stored and transported.

10

Waste bins are not overloaded, i.e. no materials are protruding from the top of the bins.

11

Waste materials are not stored on the floor. If this cannot be achieved, isolation with barricading and warning signage is in place.

12

Designated areas for site boxes, platform ladders, EWPs, etc. are provided – subcontractors and workers are requested to only bring equipment on site when it is needed and removed as soon as possible on completion of the task.

13

New or existing finishes and fixtures to be reused are to be palletised.

For example:

  • Ceiling tiles
  • Carpet tiles
  • Light fittings
  • Workstation components



While demolition activities may be classified as either structural or non-structural, the nature of the hazards and controls are often applicable to both. Structural demolition and alteration will require a separate demolition work plan, permits and approvals.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to structural demolition and alteration activities, for inclusion into the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Examples of structural demolitions and alterations may include:

  • Creation of stair penetrations
  • Demolition of lift shafts
  • Demolition of concrete in-situ stairwells
  • Demolition of load bearing
  • walls and columns (which could be timber, masonry, concrete or steel)
  • Demolition of floor or roof framing
  • Demolition of a structure or part thereof
  • Footing alterations
  • Removal of suspended slabs
  • Demolition of mezzanine levels
  • Creation of openings (e.g. for windows and doors) within load bearing walls
  • Alterations to plant and equipment structures (e.g. plant decks, HVAC units, chiller units)

3

The following legal requirements have been reviewed and considered:

  • any statutory, regulatory, or other legal impediments that may prevent the demolition of the building
  • permit applications, approvals, certificates, notifications, etc. have been submitted to relevant authorities
  • the owner/principal is legally empowered to have the building structure demolished
  • the owner/principal has identified all Hazardous Chemicals located on site, including asbestos, PCBs, lead paint, underground storage tanks, chemicals, etc., and has provided this information by way of a hazardous material register
  • the owner/principal has obtained permission to occupy adjoining neighbours’ properties, including airspace, for the purpose of erecting protective scaffold/screens for the demolition works
  • the owner/principal has provided all existing architectural, services and engineering drawings available for the demolition project
  • tender/contract documents are sufficient and complete

4

A review of the drawings has been conducted to identify:

  • the principle structural materials (e.g. timber, masonry, steel, concrete) in the roof, floor, columns, and internal and external walls
  • any secondary materials (non-structural) in ceilings, wall-panelling, partitions and floor finishes
  • the location of service supply mains (water, electricity, gas) and the extent of reticulations
  • the location of emergency services (fire detection and fire fighting)
  • other services (sewerage, drainage, air conditioning, lifts)

5

A structural engineer has been engaged to provide advice on bracing, propping, needle works and overall works methodology.

6

The existing structural system has been checked for deterioration.

7

The elements resisting vertical load (e.g. floors, beams, columns, walls) have been identified.

8

The elements resisting horizontal load (e.g. service cores, shear walls, braced frames, rigid frames) have been identified.

9

Dial before you dig has been consulted and service provider drawings obtained.

10

A service search company has been engaged to verify and locate services.

11

Underground services have been identified and located, and their points of entry to and exit from the site.

12

Levels of basements, cellars, carparks and other underground areas have been determined relative to adjacent ground levels and adjoining basement or footing levels.

13

Retaining structures have been identified that provide support to adjoining properties.

14

The location, nature and condition of all Hazardous Chemicals identified in the Hazardous Chemicals Audit been identified on site.

15

The most suitable points of ingress to and egress from the site been identified for site personnel, demolition equipment and the removal of demolished materials.

16

A dilapidation report has been compiled, recording the condition of buildings on the adjoining sites, particularly where these abut a common boundary.

17

The need for, and the extent of, any required security fencing, hoardings, or overhead protection for footpaths has been determined and implemented appropriately.

18

A demolition work plan has been developed based on the documentation and on site investigations.

19

The work plan has a level-by-level procedure for stripping, breaking-up and removal of stripped and demolished materials.

20

From the level-by-level procedure, the nature, number and sizes of mechanical equipment, and number and skills of personnel to be deployed on the working level, has been determined.

21

The use of plant and equipment has been identified, managed and controlled within the project risk register, demolition plan and contractor safe systems of work.

22

Advice from a structural engineer has been received regarding the ability of the structure to safely sustain the proposed loads.

23

The work plan details restrictions on working hours, use of public thoroughfares, noise levels, etc.

24

The work plan includes a time-line showing the commencement of work, milestones and the completion of work.

25

Approval has been given to use the demolition work plan by the client/owner and other stakeholders.

26

Permanent and emergency entrances and exits have been established.

27

An appropriate site office and site amenities have been established. Consideration has been given to portable buildings or portable amenities away from the location of risk (relevant to the scope of works).

28

All site personnel have been inducted and trained in the work plan, safety procedures, and established procedures for dealing with emergencies (e.g. accidents, fires).

29

Check State Regulator requirements to ensure that the demolition contractor’s licence is verified as appropriate for the class of demolition activity.

30

All necessary plant, equipment and tools are available and in good working order.

31

A copy of AS/NZ 2601 demolition of structures is available.

32

A checklist has been developed for daily inspections, including but not limited to:

Before commencing work, the following are checked daily:

  • All openings and elevated free edges are properly guarded
  • Temporary bracing, shoring, or propping is tight, stable and secure
  • Fire and safety services are operational and all other services to the working level have been properly disconnected
  • Hazardous Chemicals have been removed from the working level
  • Lines of communication to the supervisor are clear and operational
  • All emergency access routes are clear of debris and clearly marked

Before leaving the work site, the following are checked:

  • All partly demolished elements are stabilized
  • All demolished materials have been removed or secured against inclement weather
  • All fires or embers have been properly extinguished
  • All emergency access routes are clear of debris and clearly marked
  • All boundaries have been secured against unlawful entry
  • All public thoroughfares are clear of demolished materials and any hazard is properly lit, guarded and clearly marked

33

Any alterations to bracing, propping, structural members or demolition method have been reviewed and approved by the structural engineer in writing, prior to the alterations taking place.



Traffic Management Controls are required to separate workers, members of the public and other pedestrians from vehicles such as cars, trucks, vans, buses, cyclists and powered mobile plant (e.g. forklifts).


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to traffic management activities for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Activities that involve or affect work in public areas or on public roads must be approved by local authorities.

3

Localised Traffic Management Plans for internal access requirements, building access, etc. may require building management approval.

4

The Traffic Management Plan includes a site map, pedestrian and vehicle movements, the expected durations of interaction between vehicles and pedestrians, deliveries and loading activities, and the roles and responsibilities of people in relation to traffic management.

5

Standing site Traffic Management Controls are communicated via the Site Specific Induction. Delivery drivers or suppliers, if involved in loading or unloading activities, are also inducted to site and perform their work in accordance with their approved SWMS.

 

6

Additional task-specific consultation takes place with workers, vehicle, plant and equipment operators, delivery drivers and suppliers to communicate hazards and controls in relation to traffic management risks. Evidence of this communication is documenting using the Record of Toolbox Talk or Pre Start Meeting.

7

The hierarchy of controls should be applied (in order of preference) to:

  • Eliminate the risk of being hit by mobile plant or vehicle
  • If elimination is not possible, the physical separation of pedestrians from plant and vehicles is implemented to a standard appropriate for the level of risk (e.g. jersey kerbs, water barriers, temporary fencing, parawebbing and star pickets)
  • Scheduling of work to avoid or minimise the interaction of pedestrians, vehicles or plant in the same area at the same time
  • Engineering controls such as audible warning signals, flashing lights, automated boom gates, traffic light system
  • Signage and road markings to manage vehicle and pedestrian traffic according to the Traffic Management Plan

8

Traffic Management Controls should consider and include:

  • Traffic controllers and/or police controlling traffic
  • Road closures, footpath closure and detours
  • Appropriate lane configurations and approach speeds for the type of work being performed
  • Dedicated mobile plant haul routes
  • Temporary lighting for night works
  • Exclusion zones around mobile plant performing slewing or overhead load movements (e.g. mobile cranes)
  • Temporary signs and signalling devices are in place and operational
  • Safe Work Method Statements (SWMS)
  • Access for oversized vehicles, emergency vehicles, bicycles, local residents, people with disabilities, elderly and school children

9

Workers involved in the use of mobile plant, equipment, vehicles and traffic control are wearing task-appropriate PPE, e.g. high visibility clothing, ultraviolet (UV) protection, dust masks if there is the generation of dust, hearing protection, etc.

10

Competencies for mobile plant and vehicle operators have been verified and documented.

Note: Copies of Licences and/or Certificates are to be located within the site file, with expiry dates noted, if applicable.

11

For high risk activities such as the use of mobile plant and equipment, an Emergency Response Plan has been developed and trialled. The trial and associated corrective actions are documented in Record of Toolbox Talk – High Risk Activity Emergency Response.

12

The methods of communication defined within the Traffic Management Plan and SWMS are available and in place, e.g. intercom/loud speaker, two way radios, traffic signal lights (portable or permanent), hand signals and other equipment.



This SMS provides practical guidance on risk management strategies and safe use of angle grinders.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to equipment, including the use of angle grinders, for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Designated cutting area(s) with a work bench, power supply, waste bin and firefighting equipment should be part of the project’s site establishment strategy for the use of angle grinders.

Tasks / trades that benefit from this sort of arrangement are:

  • Metal stud and framing cutting activities – stud, track, furring channel, ceiling hangers
  • Ceramic tiling – tile cuts
  • Cable tray installation – hanging rods, uni-strut and cable tray
  • Mechanical service installation – hanger rods and uni-strut
  • Onsite aluminium joinery fabrication

3

Subcontractor SWMSs are reviewed using the SHAPE SWMS Review to ensure job steps, hazards and controls relating to the use of angle grinders are detailed – including the use of task specific PPE.

4

Standing site rules regarding the use of angle grinders and task specific PPE are communicated via the Site Specific Induction.

This includes the use of angle grinders fitted with automatic cut-off switches, commonly referred to as “dead man switches” or “paddle switches”.

5

Prior to the use of an angle grinder, a Hot Work Permit is required for each separate activity and consideration must also be given to the isolation of fire and smoke detection services and building management impairment notices.

6

Prior to accepting the use of angle grinders, alternative tools, equipment and work methods have been considered, including but not limited to:

  • offsite cutting from the supplier
  • cold cut saws
  • sabre saws
  • mechanical sheers
  • rebar cutters
  • hand tools

7

Workers must be competent in the use of angle grinders – be aware that young or inexperienced workers present a greater risk of injury and must be instructed on the safe use of equipment by a competent person such as a qualified tradesperson.

8

Before using an angle grinder:

  • The operator must be aware of the manufacturer’s instructions – these are generally available through an internet search of the equipment manufacturer’s company website
  • Ensure the grinder is the right size for the task. NB 9 inch or 230mm angle grinders are not permitted on SHAPE sites without a written risk assessment that has been approved by an Operations or EHSQ Manager
  • Guards must be fitted
  • All handles must be fitted
  • Both hands are used to hold the grinder
  • Work to be secured at all times
  • Goggles / gasketed safety glasses must be worn
  • Cut resistant full finger gloves must be worn
  • Hearing protection must be worn
  • The cutting blade must inspected for damage or wear and be suitable for the material and task
  • Only use blades and discs intended for the equipment – i.e. do not use blades designed for carving or wood shaping
  • A Hot Work Permit must be in place for the activity
  • Fire warning / detection systems must be managed to prevent activation
  • Building management must be advised that hot works are taking place
  • Ensure you are aware of building management guidelines in relation to hot works and fire system isolations
  • Adequate / suitable firefighting equipment is in the vicinity of the works and is within test date
  • Assess the location of fire sprinklers and implement controls to prevent sprinkler activation
  • Ensure there are no combustible materials, products, services or equipment in the vicinity of works
  • Ensure cylinders, drums, tanks, gas or fuel lines have been decommissioned and purged prior to cutting or working nearby
  • Ensure the maximum speed marked on the attachment is greater
    than the maximum speed marked on the angle grinder

9

If hot works are completed from height access equipment, ensure the equipment is protected from falling / flying hot debris, slag and embers.

NB suitable firefighting equipment must be positioned at the cutting area, i.e. within an EWP basket or scaffold deck

10

A 30 minute fire watch must be enacted during all work breaks and on completion of the hot works or shift.

11

Types of PPE for use of angle grinders:

  • Dust mask – selection based on the product SDS for the material being cut, sanded or ground
  • Eye protection – sealed googles, gasket rimmed glasses or face shield
  • NB standard safety glasses are not adequate eye protection for the use of angle grinders
  • Arms and legs – long trousers and long sleeved shirt – cotton or non-flammable material
  • Feet – safety footwear – low cut safety footwear not permitted
  • Hands – leather gloves or similar non-flammable / cut resistant material – must be full finger



A knife is defined as any hand held non powered cutting instrument or tool. Proper planning, training, management and monitoring of the safe use of knives is required to prevent cut injuries so far as reasonably practicable.


1

At the pre-construction phase the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to use of knives for inclusion into the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Following the development of the project Risk Register, all relevant information in relation to the use of knives is detailed within the project Site Specific Induction.

3

All workers are communicated site specific requirements for use of knives through the site induction process.

4

Subcontractor SWMS and SSOW are reviewed via the applicable SWMS Review or SSOW Review to ensure job steps relating to the use of knives and relevant hazards and controls are detailed.

NB. The use of knives must be identified separately from generic references such as the use of tools and equipment. Generic references will not be accepted.

5

Knives may not be used where there is a suitable alternative proprietary tool available for the purpose.

The use of a knife as a convenient alternative to another suitable tool is never acceptable and deemed a non-conformance to this SMS.

E.g. the use of a knife to strip cable insulation is not permitted.

6

The use of fixed and manual retracting blade knives for prying / pairing / whittling / carving / trimming excess materials is not permitted as there are generally other proprietary tools available for this purpose.

7

When a knife is deemed an acceptable option the following must be considered in order of preference:

  1. Use of a pressure sensitive auto retracting blade knife
  2. Use of a manual retracting knife
  3. Use of fixed blade knife

8

Where a manually retracting or fixed blade knife is deemed acceptable the contractor’s SWMS must detail the following controls:

  • Workers must be trained in the correct use of knives
  • Suitable cut rated gloves must be detailed specific to the use of knives
  • Knives must only be used for the approved work method
  • Always cut away from your body
  • Fixed blade knives must be holstered in an appropriate holster or have cutting edges capped when not in use
  • Fixed blade knives are never to be stored loose in toolboxes or tool bags unless they are holstered
  • Manual retracting blade knives must be retracted after every use

9

The use of domestic type knives for tasks such as lagging or insulation activities are not permitted.

Trade quality long-bladed knives may be permitted if:

  • They are the most suitable tool for the task
  • They are able to be holstered
  • The contractor’s SWMS details appropriate controls for use

10

The use of retractable craft or hobby knives and/or snap off blade type knives are not permitted. It is noted that specialist activities such as glazing and wallpapering require specialist blades that may be of the snap off type. These are permitted when documented appropriately under the subcontractor’s SWMS.

11

All workers involved in the use of fixed or manual retractable blade knives must complete a Toolbox Talk for the safe use of knives (based on the Use of Knives SHAPE Minimum Standard) at the start of every project

12

The use of knives will be monitored through Site Walk Observations and the Task Inspection processes.

Workers not complying with the requirements of this Use of Knives SHAPE Minimum Standard or their own SWMS will be managed in accordance with the SHAPE noncompliance procedure:

  • Verbal warning
  • Notice of non-compliance
  • Exclusion from site

Example: a plasterer has a perceived need to use a fixed blade knife.
13

The contractor’s SWMS must include the use of the knife as a job step and assign hazards and appropriate controls.

Hazards include – cuts, abrasions, eye injuries, etc.

Controls include – use of full finger gloves, workers are trained in the use of knives, always cut away from body, wear safety glasses, knives are holstered when not in use, knives not to be used for pairing, wittling, trimming, prying, carving, etc.

Training – all workers permitted to use fixed blade knives must take part in safe use of knives training via a Toolbox Talk.



This SMS provides practical guidance on SHAPE minimum standards for Verification of Competency (VoC).


1

During the pre-construction phase, project specific activities involving the use of mobile plant & equipment are identified within the project Risk Register, with training and competency requirements further detailed within the project Project Delivery Plan.

Note: Training and competency requirements may relate to subcontractors or SHAPE project team members.

2

A review of relevant contractor SWMS and SSOW using the applicable SWMS Review or SSOW Review will further determine the types of plant & equipment to be used for specific tasks, and any qualifications or licenses required to operate the plant & equipment.

3

Prior to the use of mobile plant or equipment, documented evidence of competency for the operation of the mobile plant and equipment has been copied and maintained on site, and is kept with the worker’s Site Specific Induction Record.

Refer to the Plant and Equipment SHAPE Minimum Standard and Plant and Equipment Procedures for further requirements relating to management controls for plant and equipment.

4

The following can be used as evidence of competency:

  1. A High-Risk Work Licence issued by a State or Territory under the National Certification System as per the legislation; or
  2. Where a High-Risk Work Licence is not required by legislation:
    A Licence or Certificate of Competency issued under previous State or Territory legislation for which there is no longer a High Risk Work Licence required, e.g. load shifting equipment; or
  3. A Statement of Attainment or Certificate issued by a Registered Training Organisation (RTO) for the successful completion of the appropriate unit of competency in the Nationally Recognised Training (NRT) package; or
  4. Evidence of a formal VoC assessment against defined competency standards, which should:
    • be completed, or confirmed as having been completed, by the accredited company to an acceptable level, such as the relevant NRT, internal VoC process, or equivalent;
    • include a detailed and documented assessment standard;
    • be completed by a person (or persons) who meets the documented competency as defined by the company to conduct a VoC assessment; and
    • be evidenced by a signed, completed VoC assessment.

5

A letter signed by an employer or supervisor claiming that the worker is competent is not an acceptable form of verification of competency.

6

Plant and Equipment activities that require verification of competency:

  • Scaffolding – Basic, Intermediate, Advanced
  • Dogmen and Riggers – Basic, Intermediate, Advanced
  • Crane Operation
  • Mobile concrete placing boom operation
  • Forklift operation
  • Tele-handler operation
  • Hoist operation
  • Elevating work platform operation
  • Earthmoving equipment operation

Note: there are several other trade related or hazardous activities that require verification of competency, including but not limited to:

  • Confined Space entry – see Confined Spaces SHAPE Minimum Standard
  • Asbestos Removal – see Asbestos Management SHAPE Minimum Standard
  • Electrical Work – see the Electrical Management SHAPE Minimum Standards
  • Restricted Electrical work
  • Plumbing and Drainage
  • Work at Heights – see Working at Heights SHAPE Minimum Standards
  • Structural Demolition and Alteration – see Structural Demolition and Alteration SHAPE Minimum Standard

For further information on competency requirements refer to the SHAPE Licenses for High Risk Work and Plant and Equipment Guide.

7

Examples of high risk work licences



Working at heights is a high risk activity and a leading cause of death and serious injury in Australia, SHAPE has specific obligations to manage the risk, as far as is reasonably practicable, of someone falling from one level to another.


1

During pre-construction the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to work at height activities for inclusion to the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Emergency procedures / rescue plans are documented for retrieval of a fallen or injured person inside the project Risk register.

3

All workers are communicated site specific requirements for work at heights hazards through the Site Specific Induction.

4

Roof works / access is controlled by the use of the Roof Access Permit.

5

Personnel involved in work at heights have the required competencies.

6

Existing height access equipment, including stairs, ladders and access hatches have been risk assessed to ensure their suitability for use and to address any training requirements for their safe use.

7

Safe access and egress has been considered, planned for and provided for personnel needing to access areas such as:

  • Roofs

  • Mechanical plant platforms

  • Mobile plant maintenance

  • Removal of façade glass for air intake louvers

  • Riser shafts

  • Formwork
  • Stair penetrations

8

Harnesses have current inspection records – copies maintained in site file.

9

Anchor points have been installed /assessed by a qualified person and are rated for the required work i.e single person or 2 person anchor.

10

Current inspection records for anchor points and other height access safety systems have been reviewed and copies maintained in the site file.

11

Exclusion zones and signage have been erected below drop zones.

12

Warning signage is appropriate to the hazard and posted at regular intervals.

13

Where a ladder other than a platform ladder is being used a documented risk assessment is in place. Workers have been tool box talked re: specific ladder use.

14

Perimeter glazing has been risk assessed with regards to damage and risk of falls and falling objects.

15

All penetrations are identified and physical barriers installed.

16

Exclusion zones are defined when working in close proximity to windows, penetrations, excavations, stairwells, stored materials and equipment, prior to
using height access equipment:

• Work platforms.
• Trestles,
• Platform ladders,
• EWPs, and
• Mobile Scaffolds



Working at heights is a high risk activity and a leading cause of death and serious injury in Australia. SHAPE has specific obligations to manage the risk, as far as is reasonably practicable, of someone falling from one level to another.


1

During pre-construction the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to work at height activities for inclusion to the project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Emergency response procedures in relation to use of height safety equipment are documented in the Project Risk Register.

3

Where existing height safety systems exist, building management requirements for roof access are considered and included in Project Risk Register.

4

All workers are communicated site specific requirements for work at heights hazards through the Site Specific Induction Handout.

5

Subcontractor SWMS are reviewed via the SHAPE SWMS/SSOW Review and the Project Risk Register to ensure work at heights activities, hazards and controls (including emergency response plans) have been addressed when appropriate.

Note: Generic references to height access equipment not relevant to contractor activities must be removed / struck out of SWMS.

6

All workers are communicated the site specific requirements for work at heights hazards through the Site Specific Induction.

7

Roof Access Permits are in place for entry into roof spaces, or for roof access requirements.

8

If existing height safety equipment is to be used (anchor points, static lines, access ladders, etc.) the project team has obtained the system’s design documentation from the building owner / manager.

If this does not exist then the system or equipment has been reviewed and approved in writing by a structural engineer.

9

The design of the anchor system is reviewed in consideration of the work to be performed to ensure the equipment is being used in accordance with the design parameters.

For example:

• Number of persons per point
• Fall arrest or fall restraint
• Use of static lines and/or inertia reels compatibility
• “Sheer” and “Pull” load ratings

10

People required to wear a harness must provide documented evidence of a “Working at Heights” competency.

11

Static lines are only installed to certified anchor points by IRATA Rope Access Level 3 technician, or a person with Advanced Rigger competency.

12

The use of building elements as tie points for static lines – such as structural steel framing or concrete structures has been reviewed and approved in writing by a structural engineer, IRATA Rope Access Level 3 technician, or a person with Advanced Rigger competency.

13

Existing anchor points are within their test date prior to use – the required frequency is every 6 months.

Anchor points are only used within their design parameters for pull and shear loads.

14

Newly installed anchor points are installed by a competent person and are accompanied by a pull test certificate.

Anchor points are only used within their design parameters for pull and shear loads.

15

Each piece of height access equipment used (e.g. belts, harnesses, lanyard assemblies, connectors, fall arrest devices including common devices) are visually inspected by the competent Operator before and after each use.

16

Each piece of height access equipment used (e.g. belts, harnesses, lanyard assemblies, and associated personal equipment, including fall arrest devices, ropes and slings) are inspected every 6 months by a height safety equipment
inspector, or more frequently if recommended by the manufacturer or supplier.

Note: the site manager must copy or photograph these records prior to work commencing.

17

Emergency Response procedures are documented and tested for the use of height safety equipment in both “Fall Restraint” and “Fall Arrest” scenarios.

Note: SHAPE’s Record of Toolbox Talk – Evacuation Drill / Testing of Emergency Response is to be used as evidence of testing.

18

A Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment has been completed for all plant and equipment that is used as part of the activity (including for emergency response). The plant and equipment is documented in the Plant and Equipment Register.

19

Exclusions zones and warning signage are considered and erected where there is a risk of falling objects present.

20

The use of tool and equipment lanyards is considered where there is a risk of falling objects.


Working at heights is a high risk activity and a leading cause of death and serious injury in Australia. SHAPE has specific obligations to manage the risk, as far as is reasonably practicable, of someone falling from one level to another.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to work at heights activities for inclusion into the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan. Where applicable, emergency response for work
at heights and building management requirements for roof access with ladders must be considered and included in controls.

2

Following the development of the project Project Delivery Plan and project Risk Register, all relevant information in relation to work at heights using ladders is detailed within the project Site Specific Induction Handout.

3

All workers are communicated the site specific requirements for work at heights and the hazards of ladders, which is recorded through their completion of a Site Specific Induction Record.

4

Subcontractor SWMS are reviewed using the SHAPE SWMS/SSOW Review to ensure work at heights activities, hazards and controls including emergency response plans have been addressed when appropriate.

Note: Generic references to height access equipment not relevant to contractor activities must be removed / struck out of SWMS.

5

Roof Access Permits are completed for any activities involving access inside roof spaces or roof tops using ladders.

6

Platform ladders are not used if there is a more suitable and stable working platform suited to the task.

7

Platform ladders may be used if suitable for the type of activity being performed.

Note: Platform ladders are not SHAPE’s preferred option for height access and should not be communicated as such.

8

“A” frame ladders are not permitted for use on SHAPE sites, unless a documented risk assessment is in place which details justifications for the use of an A frame Ladder.

9

All workers including electricians must use fibreglass ladders where LIVE cables / services hazards exist.

10

Tools and equipment are not stored on platform ladder platforms.

11

Drop zones around platform ladders require exclusion zones around them to prevent workers being impacted by falling objects.

12

Use of builder’s / extension type ladders must be risk assessed, with hazards and controls detailed within the contractor’s SWMS.

Note: In any case builder’s / extension ladders may only be used for access and inspection activities – not work activities.

13

All ladders:

• are load rated minimum industrial rating (i.e. are not rated domestic grade)
• are used with 3 points of attachment when ascending and descending the ladder, i.e. 2 hands and 1 foot, 2 feet and 1 hand

Note: This requirement will in most cases prevent workers from physically carrying tools and equipment while using the ladder unless stored in a tool belt / bag.

• are not used if missing fixings or if bracing is damaged or missing
• are not used if foot pads are damaged or missing fixings
• are not used if legs are cracked, twisted or damaged
• are not moved (walking the ladder) whilst a worker is still on the ladder

14

Platform Ladders:

  • work is always performed from the ladder platform – not the steps
  • must be positioned to ensure the worker is facing the front guard rail at all times
  • are not used within 2 metres of plate glass glazing / windows unless
    additional controls have been considered and implemented, e.g. glazing
    protection
  • are not used in the proximity of a live edge or open penetration unless a separate risk assessment has deemed the level of risk is manageable
    through additional controls – safe working distance from live edge
    calculation (working height + height of worker + plus 2 metres)

  • a rear guard rail must be in place and used for platform ladders with
    platforms over 1.8m

  • are not to be used in proximity of stored materials or equipment, where a
    fall onto the stored equipment would increase the consequences of injury

 

 

15

Builder’s / extension type ladders:

• are positioned on a firm flat surface (consider using ladder safety devices like leg levellers, anti-slip gutter guards and stabilisers)
• are secured top and bottom should be angled at a ratio of 1:4. That is, position the base of the ladder 1 metre away from the structure for every 4 metres of height
• are only to be used when a risk assessment demonstrates that this is the most suitable piece of height access equipment
• materials and ladders are not to be transported or carried during the use of a builder’s ladder

 


Working at heights is a high risk activity and a leading cause of death and serious injury in Australia. SHAPE has specific obligations to manage the risk, as far as is reasonably practicable, of someone falling from one level to another.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to work at heights activities on mobile scaffolds for inclusion into the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan. Emergency response procedures for
the use of mobile scaffolds is documented in the Project Risk Register.

2

Following the development of the project Project Delivery Plan and project Risk Register, all relevant information in relation to work at heights using mobile scaffolds is detailed within the project Site Specific Induction Handout.

3

All workers are communicated the site specific requirements for work at heights, which is recorded through their completion of a Site Specific Induction Record.

4

Subcontractor SWMS are reviewed using the SHAPE SWMS/SSOW Review and Project Risk Register to ensure work at heights activities, hazards and controls including emergency response plans for mobile scaffolds have been
addressed when appropriate.

Note: Generic references to height access equipment not relevant to contractor activities must be removed / struck out of SWMS.

5

Emergency Response procedures are documented where required, and are tested for the use of scaffolds.

Note: SHAPE’s Record of Toolbox Talk – Evacuation Drill / Testing of Emergency Response is to be used as evidence of testing.

6

All mobile scaffolds are considered as plant and equipment which require SHAPE Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment to be completed. Each item of equipment is included in the SHAPE Plant and Equipment Register.

7

Mobile scaffolds with a work platform level of 4 metres or higher must:

• Only be erected by ticketed scaffolders
• Be erected on a flat and level surface
• Have outrigger bracing installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions
• Display the manufacturer’s instructions i.e. a stick on label
or printed copy
• Have the load rating of the scaffold assessed for the scope of work, and allow a minimum buffer of 100kg to ensure the scaffold is never over loaded. i.e. 450kg load rating = load to a max of 350kg only

  • Have exclusion zones established and warning signage displayed where there is a risk of falling objects

• Never be positioned so that the worker has to overreach or work through the scaffold hand rails
• Be reinspected every 30 days by a ticketed scaffolder
• Be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions
• Be covered in the SWMS for the worker intending to use the scaffold. The worker has been trained in the safe use of the scaffold and has signed onto the SWMS
• Be inspected by the worker prior to every use, to ensure the scaffold has not been altered and is safe for use
• Have wheels locked prior to and while using the scaffold
• Be dismounted by workers prior to moving the scaffold
• Display a current inspection tag (scafftag) at all times, with handover certificates available on file

• Be modified only by a ticketed scaffolder
• Be reinspected and retagged after every modification
• Workers must:
— Carry tools and equipment in tool belts to allow hands to be free when ascending or descending from the scaffold
— Pass materials up or down from platform level as required – materials are not stockpiled on the platform
— Never stand on or climb the handrail, diagonal braces or frames

8

Mobile scaffolds with platform levels below 4 metres, including zippy scaffolds must also meet all of the requirements for scaffolds with a platform level of 4 metres or higher, with the following exceptions:

• A ticketed scaffolder is not required to erect or dismantle, however the person erecting or dismantling the scaffold must be able to demonstrate mobile scaffold erection/dismantling competency through instruction / training in the erection and use of the mobile scaffold (e.g. verification of competency by employer is acceptable. Refer to the Verification of Competency SMS)
• The scaffold is not required to display a scaffold tag
• The scaffold must be reinspected every 30 days or after every alteration by the person deemed competent to do so

9

Where scaffold is incomplete or has been observed as being a hazard, an incomplete scaffold sign must be attached and the scaffold is removed out of service to prevent it from being used.

10

The use of mobile scaffolds is monitored via the SHAPE Site Inspection Checklist and Task Observation.


Working at heights is a high risk activity and a leading cause of death and serious injury in Australia. SHAPE has specific obligations to manage the risk, as far as is reasonably practicable, of someone falling from one level to another.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to work at heights activities on mobile scaffolds for inclusion into the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan. Emergency response and rescue has been considered when selecting the type of stair used to access and egress the scaffold.

2

Following the development of the project Project Delivery Plan and project Risk Register, all relevant information in relation to work at heights using mobile scaffolds is detailed within the project Site Specific Induction Handout.

3

All workers are communicated the site specific requirements for work at heights, including relevant sections of the scaffold plan and exclusion zones, which is recorded through their completion of a Site Specific Induction Record.

4

Subcontractor SWMS are reviewed using the SHAPE SWMS/SSOW Review and Project Risk Register to ensure work at heights activities, hazards and controls including emergency response plans for scaffolds have been addressed when appropriate.

Note: Generic references to height access equipment not relevant to contractor activities must be removed / struck out of SWMS.

5

Emergency Response procedures are documented where required, and are tested for the use of scaffolds.

Note: SHAPE’s Record of Toolbox Talk – Evacuation Drill / Testing of Emergency Response is to be used as evidence of testing.

6

Risk planning / assessment has been completed to ensure that the location of the scaffolding is not hazardous to workers, other mobile plant and vehicle traffic that may move around the site, and pedestrians passing the site.

7

The scaffolding design is registered with the relevant State or Territory regulatory authority.

8

The design registration number is readily accessible in the vicinity of the scaffolding.

9

Consideration is given to ensure the type of scaffolding selected is suitable for the work that needs to be performed.

10

The risk to the public been addressed and managed, e.g. falling objects, trip hazards, impact with components.

11

The risk of unauthorised entry to the scaffolding has been adequately controlled.

12

If exclusion zones have been selected as a control measure, they must prevent:

• Persons from being hit by falling objects
• The scaffold coming into the vicinity of overhead powerlines
• Other plant and vehicle traffic from entering the zone around the scaffolding

13

Scaffolding components are compatible for the scaffold system.

14

Consideration has been given to the ground the scaffold is being
erected on, and the bearing pressure has been verified by a geotechnical or structural engineer.

15

For scaffold platforms over four metres, the erector holds the appropriate High Risk Work licence for the class of high risk work.

16

Erector/s of the scaffolding have been provided with relevant training, and this training is documented and verified.

17

Scaffolding has been erected with suitable ties at specified distances to make it stable from movement or collapse, as defined by a structural engineer or scaffold manufacturer.

18

Added loads to the scaffold (e.g. fitted rubbish chutes, hoarding panels attached the lower levels), have been incorporated into the scaffold plan/ design drawings.

19

A competent person has carried out a documented inspection on the scaffolding and the supporting structure before it is used by workers.

20

A handover certificate been provided to SHAPE after the inspection and prior to work starting on the scaffolding.

21

A system is in place to notify site workers that the scaffold is safe to access and carry out work from, such as a scafftag.

22

Inspections (minimum every 30 days) and maintenance have been carried out according to scheduled intervals and records are kept on site.

23

Scaffolding that is being erected/dismantled is completed in accordance with the scaffold plan, SWMS, manufacturer’s specifications and legislative requirements.

24

Scaffold being used as a fall arresting platform has:

• an unobstructed landing area of at least 675mm wide, able to withstand a fall impact
• if the slope of the surface or roof is under 26 degrees, the fall arresting platform is no more than 1m below the surface or roof
• if the slope of the surface or roof is over 26 degrees, the fall arresting platform is no more than 300mm below the surface or roof

25

Work activities on the scaffolding are monitored via the SHAPE Site Inspection Checklist and Task Observation.


Working at heights is a high risk activity and a leading cause of death and serious injury in Australia. SHAPE has specific obligations to manage the risk, as far as is reasonably practicable, of someone falling from one level to another.


1

During pre-construction, the project team reviews the scope of works with respect to work at heights activities for inclusion into the Project Risk Register and Project Delivery Plan.

2

Emergency procedures / rescue plans have been developed and documented for retrieval of a fallen or injured person, which is also included in the Project Risk Register.

3

All workers are communicated the site specific requirements for working on or within a roof space, including client/building owner controls, which is recorded through their completion of a Site Specific Induction Record.

4

Subcontractor SWMS are in place for contractors installing fall protection systems or accessing the roof or roof space, and are reviewed using the SHAPE SWMS/SSOW Review and Project Risk Register.

Note: Generic references to height access equipment not relevant to contractor activities must be removed / struck out of SWMS.

5

Roof works / access is controlled by the use of the SHAPE Roof Access Permit.

6

The building asbestos register / Div 5 has been reviewed for hazardous materials within and surrounding the roofing material.

7

The presence of asbestos has been confirmed or discounted.

Note: where ACM is present, assumed or suspected to be present, management controls must be implemented in accordance with the SHAPE Asbestos Management Procedure.

8

All Plant and Equipment associated with roof access works, including installation of fall protection systems, have undergone a Plant and Equipment Risk Assessment.

9

Daily Pre-Start Meetings include roof access and work at heights hazards and controls. Wind and weather conditions have been considered as part of this process.

10

Workers have a working at heights competency, which has been be verified via a relevant ticket, licence or certificate – copies are maintained on site, and kept with the worker’s Site Specific Induction Record.

11

Temporary guardrail or handrail systems are installed and certified by a competent person.

Note: a record of competency and sign off certificate
are required.

12

Guardrail or Handrail systems incorporate a top and mid rail, toe board and/or mesh barriers, and are rated for 550N.

13

Workers and members of the public at ground level are protected from falling objects.

14

Anchor points have been certified by a competent person within the past six months.

15

No Go Zones are set back a minimum of 3 metres from a live edge, are clearly defined, signposted and communicated via a Record of Toolbox Talk.

16

Roof penetrations have physical barriers, exclusion zones and/or mesh covers to prevent falls.

17

Suitable access is in place to the roof or ceiling space in consideration of tasks to be performed.

18

Areas defined as non-trafficable are identified and sign posted.

19

Materials and equipment are adequately secured at all times.

Note: wind gusts and/or weather events can cause significant damage or injury without warning.